[OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics


Gaby Mindreci
 

Hello to all,

 

For those who are new to the group, we started a similar discussion one year ago trying to find direction in adopting a realistic metric such as GB of data processed per kWh of power into the data center.

The first attachment was the initial teaser. In the second, I combined various references and since then I accumulated many others. It is clear that the OCP community believes that PUE is not an efficiency indicator but it appears a hard metric with a detailed determination method will not arise unless a specific project is started and some actual effort goes in it.

 

I also did the Data Center Metrics Deficiency presentation at the Tech Week in November. See the last attachment. Slide 6 shows where the significant power losses occur in the power distribution infrastructure. This is a good area to map and define to start with. In addition to this, the elephant in the room is the power used for cooling. This is an area where there is a lot of opportunity for innovation and new technology.

 

Many in this audience and within the OCP community believe in a metric such as GB/kWh and it is a metric that can be assigned to one rack, to a row and a complete data center as well. The challenge is to define the method.

 

Kind regards, Gaby Mindreci

MINDREACH | imagination 2 innovation | www.m-i2i.com

+33 6 33 08 50 62

 

 

From: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of Hesham <helbakoury@...>
Reply-To: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Monday, April 12, 2021 at 7:57 PM
To: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io>, "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

The attached paper describes PUE limitations and suggest other metrics to address them.

Hesham

On 4/12/2021 9:51 AM, Herb Zien wrote:

The PUE formula has flaws and can be gamed.  Power draw is not energy consumption. It is possible to pick a favorable time to read meters, when chillers are not operating for example, in order to make a facility appear more energy efficient than it really is.

 

Also, server fans, which can account for 20% of total rack power at full load, are treated as IT power and not cooling. This increases the denominator, thereby reducing PUE. For example, when data center temperatures are increased the central A/C energy draw might go down but rack fans will need to load up. The PUE goes down when total energy usage might increase.

 

Herb Zien

LiquidCool Solutions, Inc.

(414) 803-6010

 

From: OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Mitchell via groups.io
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2021 11:26 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

PUE is a decent metric above values of 1.20 (or there-abouts).  Key limitation is that improvements in ITE efficiency will cause PUE to increase (worsen) even as data center efficiency improves. 

This impact becomes of greater concern as PUE levels drop below 1.2, and/or use of liquid cooling becomes significant or use of high airflow/delta T in servers becomes significant (see ASHRAE TC9.9 discussions).

 

Each of the other metrics – CUE, WUE, ERE also have flaws that become of greater concern as you maximize sustainability (sort of a Heisenberg uncertainty principle of sustainability metrics)

 

Noble goals, would highlight need for metric maintenance.

 

Kind Regards & Keep Safe

 

Don Mitchell
Data Center Division Manager


Data Center Solutions page


+1-425-379-8335
Don.Mitchell@...

    

100 Years of Innovation - Forbes:  Victaulic’s Industrial Legacy…June 2019

Construction Tech Review – Top 10 BIM Consulting Services Companies:  “From preconstruction through installation, Victaulic provides a suite of services tailored to fit the project needs at every stage of the construction timeline

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of mark.dansie@...
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2021 9:07 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

John,

 

Thanks for your comments.

 

It’s interesting that you’ve mentioned PUE, because it is already one of the metrics listed in the Colo Site Assessment under the title of ‘Efficiency’.  I’ve always believed PUE to be a metric, albeit flawed, to measure data center efficiency rather than sustainability, and therefore I didn’t list it in my email below.

 

PUE is one of the metrics listed in the Colo Site Assessment under the title of ‘Efficiency’ alongside WUE and CUE.  To download a copy of the current OCP Ready colo site assessment go to the link below:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/17F2mGnfxdXLhqXKwc1wVtoQdPFbLRrlJsCsZ1laT3AQ/copy#gid=679407764

 

Being able to measure the Scope 3 emissions for the construction of a facility should be considered.

 

In many respects a colo isn’t any different from other types of data centers, but the request I’ve made for feedback is specifically for the OCP Ready™ Facility Recognition Program, which has been created for colocation solution providers.

 

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Wallerich
Sent: 12 April 2021 15:41
To: ocp-acf@ocp-all.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Mark,

 

It depends on what you're trying to measure.  I would think PUE would be useful but the question is, are you also considering embodied carbons or sustainability from a materials perspective of the facility itself.

 

Energy consumption, like IT load, is a Scope 2 carbon emission where embodied carbons measure Scope 3 emissions.

 

Per your question, when measuring sustainability from a carbon emissions standpoint, is a COLO any different than any other data center?

 

Regards,

 

John

 

On Mon, Apr 12, 2021 at 1:49 AM <mark.dansie@...> wrote:

Hi DCF Group,

 

I would like to get your feedback re: suitable metrics for measuring a colocation data center’s sustainability, that should be used as part of the OCP Ready program .

 

Within the current colo site assessment we have the below attributes that help to measure a data center’s sustainability:

 

  • Site WUE Monitoring
  • Site CUE Monitoring

 

It would be great to have your input on any other metrics that we should be considering, for inclusion in the next iteration of the colo site assessment and also the colo facility guidelines doc., such as Energy Reuse Effectiveness (ERE).

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 


Gaby Mindreci
 

Hi John,

 

Everything you say makes sense. This is why I always thought maybe this metric might have merit if taken backwards, from billing. All services are billed right? And if they are billed, then they are measured. And on the same token, power coming in is metered accordingly so therefore theoretically there is a way. We would need to have conventions on north-south, east-west movements, then the relationship of power to stored data, etc.

 

The purpose of knowing how far a watt could go, is to stimulate a race for efficiency. There are plenty of opportunities to improve efficiency (in my presentation, I used an example on connectors which are benign passive components).

Some global locations already really struggle with the amount of power available to their facilities and as this demand goes up, a crisis will soon emerge. Think of power availability to island nations, their infrastructure is heavily dependent on fossil fuel generation and with power demands for computing growing at current rates, it is only a matter of time to recognize in fact that these are the early signs on what is to follow at full global scale.

 

Technology needs to step-up so we are able to meet the needs of the computing industry 10 to 20 years into the future. The efficiency metric is needed to raise awareness, provide easy and instinctive feel on what that efficiency means and to stimulate competition.

 

Kind regards, Gaby Mindreci

MINDREACH | imagination 2 innovation | www.m-i2i.com

+33 6 33 08 50 62

 

 

From: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of John Wallerich <john.wallerich@...>
Reply-To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, April 13, 2021 at 3:33 PM
To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io>, "OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Gaby,

 

Measuring the amount of data processed per kWh is a daunting challenge.  Many years ago while at Intel we tried to develop an easy to use method, but given the complexity of the challenge we never succeeded.  We didn't look at how much data could be processed as that was just one function of a server, and what does "process" mean.

 

John Pflueger of Dell (and Green Grid leader) developed a metric of watts per transaction, a transaction being a much more uniform and measurable metric.  It wasn't perfect, but it was much simpler to use.  Yet today we still struggle to measure the practical benefit of a Watt consumed.  

 

I served in the Green Grid committee that published PUE, and I authored the first paper on DCiE.  We knew the industry would abuse PUE, and they have.  But it has still had a significant impact as it focused on the one area we could affect, the facilities infrastructure.  But at the end of the day, the only metric that really matters is reducing total site power.  I'm not convinced that pursuing the benefit/Watt ratio is feasible or meaningful given the myriad of variables.   A good debate topic though.

 

Regards,

 

John Wallerich

Chief Solutions Officer 

408-718-2443

 

On Tue, Apr 13, 2021 at 12:12 AM Gaby Mindreci <gaby@...> wrote:

Hello to all,

 

For those who are new to the group, we started a similar discussion one year ago trying to find direction in adopting a realistic metric such as GB of data processed per kWh of power into the data center.

The first attachment was the initial teaser. In the second, I combined various references and since then I accumulated many others. It is clear that the OCP community believes that PUE is not an efficiency indicator but it appears a hard metric with a detailed determination method will not arise unless a specific project is started and some actual effort goes in it.

 

I also did the Data Center Metrics Deficiency presentation at the Tech Week in November. See the last attachment. Slide 6 shows where the significant power losses occur in the power distribution infrastructure. This is a good area to map and define to start with. In addition to this, the elephant in the room is the power used for cooling. This is an area where there is a lot of opportunity for innovation and new technology.

 

Many in this audience and within the OCP community believe in a metric such as GB/kWh and it is a metric that can be assigned to one rack, to a row and a complete data center as well. The challenge is to define the method.

 

Kind regards, Gaby Mindreci

MINDREACH | imagination 2 innovation | www.m-i2i.com

+33 6 33 08 50 62

 

 

From: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of Hesham <helbakoury@...>
Reply-To: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Monday, April 12, 2021 at 7:57 PM
To: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io>, "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

The attached paper describes PUE limitations and suggest other metrics to address them.

Hesham

On 4/12/2021 9:51 AM, Herb Zien wrote:

The PUE formula has flaws and can be gamed.  Power draw is not energy consumption. It is possible to pick a favorable time to read meters, when chillers are not operating for example, in order to make a facility appear more energy efficient than it really is.

 

Also, server fans, which can account for 20% of total rack power at full load, are treated as IT power and not cooling. This increases the denominator, thereby reducing PUE. For example, when data center temperatures are increased the central A/C energy draw might go down but rack fans will need to load up. The PUE goes down when total energy usage might increase.

 

Herb Zien

LiquidCool Solutions, Inc.

(414) 803-6010

 

From: OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Mitchell via groups.io
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2021 11:26 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

PUE is a decent metric above values of 1.20 (or there-abouts).  Key limitation is that improvements in ITE efficiency will cause PUE to increase (worsen) even as data center efficiency improves. 

This impact becomes of greater concern as PUE levels drop below 1.2, and/or use of liquid cooling becomes significant or use of high airflow/delta T in servers becomes significant (see ASHRAE TC9.9 discussions).

 

Each of the other metrics – CUE, WUE, ERE also have flaws that become of greater concern as you maximize sustainability (sort of a Heisenberg uncertainty principle of sustainability metrics)

 

Noble goals, would highlight need for metric maintenance.

 

Kind Regards & Keep Safe

 

Don Mitchell
Data Center Division Manager


Data Center Solutions page


+1-425-379-8335
Don.Mitchell@...

    

100 Years of Innovation - Forbes:  Victaulic’s Industrial Legacy…June 2019

Construction Tech Review – Top 10 BIM Consulting Services Companies:  “From preconstruction through installation, Victaulic provides a suite of services tailored to fit the project needs at every stage of the construction timeline

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of mark.dansie@...
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2021 9:07 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

John,

 

Thanks for your comments.

 

It’s interesting that you’ve mentioned PUE, because it is already one of the metrics listed in the Colo Site Assessment under the title of ‘Efficiency’.  I’ve always believed PUE to be a metric, albeit flawed, to measure data center efficiency rather than sustainability, and therefore I didn’t list it in my email below.

 

PUE is one of the metrics listed in the Colo Site Assessment under the title of ‘Efficiency’ alongside WUE and CUE.  To download a copy of the current OCP Ready colo site assessment go to the link below:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/17F2mGnfxdXLhqXKwc1wVtoQdPFbLRrlJsCsZ1laT3AQ/copy#gid=679407764

 

Being able to measure the Scope 3 emissions for the construction of a facility should be considered.

 

In many respects a colo isn’t any different from other types of data centers, but the request I’ve made for feedback is specifically for the OCP Ready™ Facility Recognition Program, which has been created for colocation solution providers.

 

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Wallerich
Sent: 12 April 2021 15:41
To: ocp-acf@ocp-all.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Mark,

 

It depends on what you're trying to measure.  I would think PUE would be useful but the question is, are you also considering embodied carbons or sustainability from a materials perspective of the facility itself.

 

Energy consumption, like IT load, is a Scope 2 carbon emission where embodied carbons measure Scope 3 emissions.

 

Per your question, when measuring sustainability from a carbon emissions standpoint, is a COLO any different than any other data center?

 

Regards,

 

John

 

On Mon, Apr 12, 2021 at 1:49 AM <mark.dansie@...> wrote:

Hi DCF Group,

 

I would like to get your feedback re: suitable metrics for measuring a colocation data center’s sustainability, that should be used as part of the OCP Ready program .

 

Within the current colo site assessment we have the below attributes that help to measure a data center’s sustainability:

 

  • Site WUE Monitoring
  • Site CUE Monitoring

 

It would be great to have your input on any other metrics that we should be considering, for inclusion in the next iteration of the colo site assessment and also the colo facility guidelines doc., such as Energy Reuse Effectiveness (ERE).

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 


John Wallerich <john.wallerich@...>
 

Gaby,

Measuring the amount of data processed per kWh is a daunting challenge.  Many years ago while at Intel we tried to develop an easy to use method, but given the complexity of the challenge we never succeeded.  We didn't look at how much data could be processed as that was just one function of a server, and what does "process" mean.

John Pflueger of Dell (and Green Grid leader) developed a metric of watts per transaction, a transaction being a much more uniform and measurable metric.  It wasn't perfect, but it was much simpler to use.  Yet today we still struggle to measure the practical benefit of a Watt consumed.  

I served in the Green Grid committee that published PUE, and I authored the first paper on DCiE.  We knew the industry would abuse PUE, and they have.  But it has still had a significant impact as it focused on the one area we could affect, the facilities infrastructure.  But at the end of the day, the only metric that really matters is reducing total site power.  I'm not convinced that pursuing the benefit/Watt ratio is feasible or meaningful given the myriad of variables.   A good debate topic though.

Regards,

John Wallerich
Chief Solutions Officer 
408-718-2443


On Tue, Apr 13, 2021 at 12:12 AM Gaby Mindreci <gaby@...> wrote:

Hello to all,

 

For those who are new to the group, we started a similar discussion one year ago trying to find direction in adopting a realistic metric such as GB of data processed per kWh of power into the data center.

The first attachment was the initial teaser. In the second, I combined various references and since then I accumulated many others. It is clear that the OCP community believes that PUE is not an efficiency indicator but it appears a hard metric with a detailed determination method will not arise unless a specific project is started and some actual effort goes in it.

 

I also did the Data Center Metrics Deficiency presentation at the Tech Week in November. See the last attachment. Slide 6 shows where the significant power losses occur in the power distribution infrastructure. This is a good area to map and define to start with. In addition to this, the elephant in the room is the power used for cooling. This is an area where there is a lot of opportunity for innovation and new technology.

 

Many in this audience and within the OCP community believe in a metric such as GB/kWh and it is a metric that can be assigned to one rack, to a row and a complete data center as well. The challenge is to define the method.

 

Kind regards, Gaby Mindreci

MINDREACH | imagination 2 innovation | www.m-i2i.com

+33 6 33 08 50 62

 

 

From: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of Hesham <helbakoury@...>
Reply-To: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Monday, April 12, 2021 at 7:57 PM
To: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io>, "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

The attached paper describes PUE limitations and suggest other metrics to address them.

Hesham

On 4/12/2021 9:51 AM, Herb Zien wrote:

The PUE formula has flaws and can be gamed.  Power draw is not energy consumption. It is possible to pick a favorable time to read meters, when chillers are not operating for example, in order to make a facility appear more energy efficient than it really is.

 

Also, server fans, which can account for 20% of total rack power at full load, are treated as IT power and not cooling. This increases the denominator, thereby reducing PUE. For example, when data center temperatures are increased the central A/C energy draw might go down but rack fans will need to load up. The PUE goes down when total energy usage might increase.

 

Herb Zien

LiquidCool Solutions, Inc.

(414) 803-6010

 

From: OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Mitchell via groups.io
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2021 11:26 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

PUE is a decent metric above values of 1.20 (or there-abouts).  Key limitation is that improvements in ITE efficiency will cause PUE to increase (worsen) even as data center efficiency improves. 

This impact becomes of greater concern as PUE levels drop below 1.2, and/or use of liquid cooling becomes significant or use of high airflow/delta T in servers becomes significant (see ASHRAE TC9.9 discussions).

 

Each of the other metrics – CUE, WUE, ERE also have flaws that become of greater concern as you maximize sustainability (sort of a Heisenberg uncertainty principle of sustainability metrics)

 

Noble goals, would highlight need for metric maintenance.

 

Kind Regards & Keep Safe

 

Don Mitchell
Data Center Division Manager


Data Center Solutions page


+1-425-379-8335
Don.Mitchell@...

    

100 Years of Innovation - Forbes:  Victaulic’s Industrial Legacy…June 2019

Construction Tech Review – Top 10 BIM Consulting Services Companies:  “From preconstruction through installation, Victaulic provides a suite of services tailored to fit the project needs at every stage of the construction timeline

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of mark.dansie@...
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2021 9:07 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

John,

 

Thanks for your comments.

 

It’s interesting that you’ve mentioned PUE, because it is already one of the metrics listed in the Colo Site Assessment under the title of ‘Efficiency’.  I’ve always believed PUE to be a metric, albeit flawed, to measure data center efficiency rather than sustainability, and therefore I didn’t list it in my email below.

 

PUE is one of the metrics listed in the Colo Site Assessment under the title of ‘Efficiency’ alongside WUE and CUE.  To download a copy of the current OCP Ready colo site assessment go to the link below:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/17F2mGnfxdXLhqXKwc1wVtoQdPFbLRrlJsCsZ1laT3AQ/copy#gid=679407764

 

Being able to measure the Scope 3 emissions for the construction of a facility should be considered.

 

In many respects a colo isn’t any different from other types of data centers, but the request I’ve made for feedback is specifically for the OCP Ready™ Facility Recognition Program, which has been created for colocation solution providers.

 

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Wallerich
Sent: 12 April 2021 15:41
To: ocp-acf@ocp-all.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Mark,

 

It depends on what you're trying to measure.  I would think PUE would be useful but the question is, are you also considering embodied carbons or sustainability from a materials perspective of the facility itself.

 

Energy consumption, like IT load, is a Scope 2 carbon emission where embodied carbons measure Scope 3 emissions.

 

Per your question, when measuring sustainability from a carbon emissions standpoint, is a COLO any different than any other data center?

 

Regards,

 

John

 

On Mon, Apr 12, 2021 at 1:49 AM <mark.dansie@...> wrote:

Hi DCF Group,

 

I would like to get your feedback re: suitable metrics for measuring a colocation data center’s sustainability, that should be used as part of the OCP Ready program .

 

Within the current colo site assessment we have the below attributes that help to measure a data center’s sustainability:

 

  • Site WUE Monitoring
  • Site CUE Monitoring

 

It would be great to have your input on any other metrics that we should be considering, for inclusion in the next iteration of the colo site assessment and also the colo facility guidelines doc., such as Energy Reuse Effectiveness (ERE).

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 


Gaby Mindreci
 

Hi Jonathan and all group members,

 

The whole idea on this efficiency exercise was to find a metric which would instantly tell the story on how efficient a data center is, starting from the rack. Think of a fridge that has an Energy Star rating on the door. As a consumer, when shopping, you look at the energy star rating and use that metric to help you decide which fridge to buy.

 

For the data center, ideally you would have a measure which can indicate the total electrical power efficiency which can be segmented for each device as a relationship of how much comes in and how much gets out. Nothing else.

 

Why is this such a difficult task to accomplish and why are there so many different opinions on how to measure either efficiency or effectiveness or whatever we may want to call it?

 

…I am going to share a couple of reflections with the community at the risk to receive some criticism but the objective is to stimulate renewed interest to the topic.

 

With background into aerospace applications, my mind takes me to how straight forward it is to define and interpret the efficiency ratings on aircraft and why is that? It is because the relationship between input and output is easily quantifiable as they are both physical entities and therefore the ratio between fuel consumed and distance or load is clear as day.

 

To take the thought further, if we look at lean manufacturing concepts used in industry, again the ratio between effort in and output is easily quantifiable because both entities are physical. The objective is always to put less in and get more out….

 

And hereby comes the point: In our evolution, humanity is faced for the very first time with a new type of challenge where the resulting output of an extremely complex aggregate is not physical, it is completely virtual. And to make matters worse, the physical output is a completely unwanted entity: low, low-grade heat that offers no benefit and requires even more energy to channel it away.

 

In reality, the data center, ladies and gentlemen, is a HEAT factory:

Diagram

Description automatically generated

 

If we recognize this, we need to step aside and think….  Oh, wait, how much energy is used by the brain to think?... lol

 

 

So how can we truly quantify efficiency? A ratio of total power in to total heat out? But this means there is no value indicator related to the amount of virtual output so we are back to square one.

 

Think of this: is it possible that we are now at the early stages of another kind of evolutionary process and just like nature already figured it out, the data center should not exist as a stand-alone entity and maybe it should be a synergistic part of another process which actually yields a physical output? Or a process which captures all the heat to regenerate power rather than letting it all go out into the atmosphere?

 

Is it possible that one day, all this low-grade residual heat becomes a commodity for which competitive bidding takes place?

 

Who’s in to take this further?

 

 

Kind regards,

MINDREACH | imagination 2 innovation | www.m-i2i.com

+33 6 33 08 50 62

 

 

From: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of Jonathan Evans <j.evans@...>
Reply-To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, April 14, 2021 at 8:33 AM
To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io>, "OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hi all,

 

Very interesting discussion. I may not have read all the emails though,  I have a PUE conundrum.

 

We work with Green Revolution Cooling. Immersion cooling solutions.

 

If you have a server load of 1000kW and you remove the fans to immerse them the ‘IT load’  load drops by 10-15%.

 

The only power you need for the immersion cooling is that 10-15% for the pumps. No other cooling load.

 

So what is the PUE?

 

I also work with EcoDataCenter and they are the first facility to show detailed cardon calculations to show they are ‘climate positive’.  Measuring a datacenter carbon footprint including embedded carbon in the servers might be the way forward.

https://ecodatacenter.se/why-ecodatacenter/climate-calculation/

 

Regards

 

Jonathan H. Evans

Director

                    

 

T:  +44(0)7736742797

Ej.evans@...

W: www.totaldatacentresolutions.co.uk

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gaby Mindreci
Sent: 13 April 2021 15:29
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hi John,

 

Everything you say makes sense. This is why I always thought maybe this metric might have merit if taken backwards, from billing. All services are billed right? And if they are billed, then they are measured. And on the same token, power coming in is metered accordingly so therefore theoretically there is a way. We would need to have conventions on north-south, east-west movements, then the relationship of power to stored data, etc.

 

The purpose of knowing how far a watt could go, is to stimulate a race for efficiency. There are plenty of opportunities to improve efficiency (in my presentation, I used an example on connectors which are benign passive components).

Some global locations already really struggle with the amount of power available to their facilities and as this demand goes up, a crisis will soon emerge. Think of power availability to island nations, their infrastructure is heavily dependent on fossil fuel generation and with power demands for computing growing at current rates, it is only a matter of time to recognize in fact that these are the early signs on what is to follow at full global scale.

 

Technology needs to step-up so we are able to meet the needs of the computing industry 10 to 20 years into the future. The efficiency metric is needed to raise awareness, provide easy and instinctive feel on what that efficiency means and to stimulate competition.

 

Kind regards, Gaby Mindreci

MINDREACH | imagination 2 innovation | www.m-i2i.com

+33 6 33 08 50 62

 

 

From: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of John Wallerich <john.wallerich@...>
Reply-To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, April 13, 2021 at 3:33 PM
To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io>, "OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Gaby,

 

Measuring the amount of data processed per kWh is a daunting challenge.  Many years ago while at Intel we tried to develop an easy to use method, but given the complexity of the challenge we never succeeded.  We didn't look at how much data could be processed as that was just one function of a server, and what does "process" mean.

 

John Pflueger of Dell (and Green Grid leader) developed a metric of watts per transaction, a transaction being a much more uniform and measurable metric.  It wasn't perfect, but it was much simpler to use.  Yet today we still struggle to measure the practical benefit of a Watt consumed.  

 

I served in the Green Grid committee that published PUE, and I authored the first paper on DCiE.  We knew the industry would abuse PUE, and they have.  But it has still had a significant impact as it focused on the one area we could affect, the facilities infrastructure.  But at the end of the day, the only metric that really matters is reducing total site power.  I'm not convinced that pursuing the benefit/Watt ratio is feasible or meaningful given the myriad of variables.   A good debate topic though.

 

Regards,

 

John Wallerich

Chief Solutions Officer 

408-718-2443

 

On Tue, Apr 13, 2021 at 12:12 AM Gaby Mindreci <gaby@...> wrote:

Hello to all,

 

For those who are new to the group, we started a similar discussion one year ago trying to find direction in adopting a realistic metric such as GB of data processed per kWh of power into the data center.

The first attachment was the initial teaser. In the second, I combined various references and since then I accumulated many others. It is clear that the OCP community believes that PUE is not an efficiency indicator but it appears a hard metric with a detailed determination method will not arise unless a specific project is started and some actual effort goes in it.

 

I also did the Data Center Metrics Deficiency presentation at the Tech Week in November. See the last attachment. Slide 6 shows where the significant power losses occur in the power distribution infrastructure. This is a good area to map and define to start with. In addition to this, the elephant in the room is the power used for cooling. This is an area where there is a lot of opportunity for innovation and new technology.

 

Many in this audience and within the OCP community believe in a metric such as GB/kWh and it is a metric that can be assigned to one rack, to a row and a complete data center as well. The challenge is to define the method.

 

Kind regards, Gaby Mindreci

MINDREACH | imagination 2 innovation | www.m-i2i.com

+33 6 33 08 50 62

 

 

From: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of Hesham <helbakoury@...>
Reply-To: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Monday, April 12, 2021 at 7:57 PM
To: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io>, "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

The attached paper describes PUE limitations and suggest other metrics to address them.

Hesham

On 4/12/2021 9:51 AM, Herb Zien wrote:

The PUE formula has flaws and can be gamed.  Power draw is not energy consumption. It is possible to pick a favorable time to read meters, when chillers are not operating for example, in order to make a facility appear more energy efficient than it really is.

 

Also, server fans, which can account for 20% of total rack power at full load, are treated as IT power and not cooling. This increases the denominator, thereby reducing PUE. For example, when data center temperatures are increased the central A/C energy draw might go down but rack fans will need to load up. The PUE goes down when total energy usage might increase.

 

Herb Zien

LiquidCool Solutions, Inc.

(414) 803-6010

 

From: OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Mitchell via groups.io
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2021 11:26 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

PUE is a decent metric above values of 1.20 (or there-abouts).  Key limitation is that improvements in ITE efficiency will cause PUE to increase (worsen) even as data center efficiency improves. 

This impact becomes of greater concern as PUE levels drop below 1.2, and/or use of liquid cooling becomes significant or use of high airflow/delta T in servers becomes significant (see ASHRAE TC9.9 discussions).

 

Each of the other metrics – CUE, WUE, ERE also have flaws that become of greater concern as you maximize sustainability (sort of a Heisenberg uncertainty principle of sustainability metrics)

 

Noble goals, would highlight need for metric maintenance.

 

Kind Regards & Keep Safe

 

Don Mitchell
Data Center Division Manager


Data Center Solutions page


+1-425-379-8335
Don.Mitchell@...

    

100 Years of Innovation - Forbes:  Victaulic’s Industrial Legacy…June 2019

Construction Tech Review – Top 10 BIM Consulting Services Companies:  “From preconstruction through installation, Victaulic provides a suite of services tailored to fit the project needs at every stage of the construction timeline

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of mark.dansie@...
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2021 9:07 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

John,

 

Thanks for your comments.

 

It’s interesting that you’ve mentioned PUE, because it is already one of the metrics listed in the Colo Site Assessment under the title of ‘Efficiency’.  I’ve always believed PUE to be a metric, albeit flawed, to measure data center efficiency rather than sustainability, and therefore I didn’t list it in my email below.

 

PUE is one of the metrics listed in the Colo Site Assessment under the title of ‘Efficiency’ alongside WUE and CUE.  To download a copy of the current OCP Ready colo site assessment go to the link below:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/17F2mGnfxdXLhqXKwc1wVtoQdPFbLRrlJsCsZ1laT3AQ/copy#gid=679407764

 

Being able to measure the Scope 3 emissions for the construction of a facility should be considered.

 

In many respects a colo isn’t any different from other types of data centers, but the request I’ve made for feedback is specifically for the OCP Ready™ Facility Recognition Program, which has been created for colocation solution providers.

 

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Wallerich
Sent: 12 April 2021 15:41
To: ocp-acf@ocp-all.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Mark,

 

It depends on what you're trying to measure.  I would think PUE would be useful but the question is, are you also considering embodied carbons or sustainability from a materials perspective of the facility itself.

 

Energy consumption, like IT load, is a Scope 2 carbon emission where embodied carbons measure Scope 3 emissions.

 

Per your question, when measuring sustainability from a carbon emissions standpoint, is a COLO any different than any other data center?

 

Regards,

 

John

 

On Mon, Apr 12, 2021 at 1:49 AM <mark.dansie@...> wrote:

Hi DCF Group,

 

I would like to get your feedback re: suitable metrics for measuring a colocation data center’s sustainability, that should be used as part of the OCP Ready program .

 

Within the current colo site assessment we have the below attributes that help to measure a data center’s sustainability:

 

  • Site WUE Monitoring
  • Site CUE Monitoring

 

It would be great to have your input on any other metrics that we should be considering, for inclusion in the next iteration of the colo site assessment and also the colo facility guidelines doc., such as Energy Reuse Effectiveness (ERE).

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 


Jonathan Evans <j.evans@...>
 

Hi all,

 

Very interesting discussion. I may not have read all the emails though,  I have a PUE conundrum.

 

We work with Green Revolution Cooling. Immersion cooling solutions.

 

If you have a server load of 1000kW and you remove the fans to immerse them the ‘IT load’  load drops by 10-15%.

 

The only power you need for the immersion cooling is that 10-15% for the pumps. No other cooling load.

 

So what is the PUE?

 

I also work with EcoDataCenter and they are the first facility to show detailed cardon calculations to show they are ‘climate positive’.  Measuring a datacenter carbon footprint including embedded carbon in the servers might be the way forward.

https://ecodatacenter.se/why-ecodatacenter/climate-calculation/

 

Regards

 

Jonathan H. Evans

Director

                    

 

T:  +44(0)7736742797

Ej.evans@...

W: www.totaldatacentresolutions.co.uk

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gaby Mindreci
Sent: 13 April 2021 15:29
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hi John,

 

Everything you say makes sense. This is why I always thought maybe this metric might have merit if taken backwards, from billing. All services are billed right? And if they are billed, then they are measured. And on the same token, power coming in is metered accordingly so therefore theoretically there is a way. We would need to have conventions on north-south, east-west movements, then the relationship of power to stored data, etc.

 

The purpose of knowing how far a watt could go, is to stimulate a race for efficiency. There are plenty of opportunities to improve efficiency (in my presentation, I used an example on connectors which are benign passive components).

Some global locations already really struggle with the amount of power available to their facilities and as this demand goes up, a crisis will soon emerge. Think of power availability to island nations, their infrastructure is heavily dependent on fossil fuel generation and with power demands for computing growing at current rates, it is only a matter of time to recognize in fact that these are the early signs on what is to follow at full global scale.

 

Technology needs to step-up so we are able to meet the needs of the computing industry 10 to 20 years into the future. The efficiency metric is needed to raise awareness, provide easy and instinctive feel on what that efficiency means and to stimulate competition.

 

Kind regards, Gaby Mindreci

MINDREACH | imagination 2 innovation | www.m-i2i.com

+33 6 33 08 50 62

 

 

From: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of John Wallerich <john.wallerich@...>
Reply-To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, April 13, 2021 at 3:33 PM
To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io>, "OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Gaby,

 

Measuring the amount of data processed per kWh is a daunting challenge.  Many years ago while at Intel we tried to develop an easy to use method, but given the complexity of the challenge we never succeeded.  We didn't look at how much data could be processed as that was just one function of a server, and what does "process" mean.

 

John Pflueger of Dell (and Green Grid leader) developed a metric of watts per transaction, a transaction being a much more uniform and measurable metric.  It wasn't perfect, but it was much simpler to use.  Yet today we still struggle to measure the practical benefit of a Watt consumed.  

 

I served in the Green Grid committee that published PUE, and I authored the first paper on DCiE.  We knew the industry would abuse PUE, and they have.  But it has still had a significant impact as it focused on the one area we could affect, the facilities infrastructure.  But at the end of the day, the only metric that really matters is reducing total site power.  I'm not convinced that pursuing the benefit/Watt ratio is feasible or meaningful given the myriad of variables.   A good debate topic though.

 

Regards,

 

John Wallerich

Chief Solutions Officer 

408-718-2443

 

On Tue, Apr 13, 2021 at 12:12 AM Gaby Mindreci <gaby@...> wrote:

Hello to all,

 

For those who are new to the group, we started a similar discussion one year ago trying to find direction in adopting a realistic metric such as GB of data processed per kWh of power into the data center.

The first attachment was the initial teaser. In the second, I combined various references and since then I accumulated many others. It is clear that the OCP community believes that PUE is not an efficiency indicator but it appears a hard metric with a detailed determination method will not arise unless a specific project is started and some actual effort goes in it.

 

I also did the Data Center Metrics Deficiency presentation at the Tech Week in November. See the last attachment. Slide 6 shows where the significant power losses occur in the power distribution infrastructure. This is a good area to map and define to start with. In addition to this, the elephant in the room is the power used for cooling. This is an area where there is a lot of opportunity for innovation and new technology.

 

Many in this audience and within the OCP community believe in a metric such as GB/kWh and it is a metric that can be assigned to one rack, to a row and a complete data center as well. The challenge is to define the method.

 

Kind regards, Gaby Mindreci

MINDREACH | imagination 2 innovation | www.m-i2i.com

+33 6 33 08 50 62

 

 

From: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of Hesham <helbakoury@...>
Reply-To: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Monday, April 12, 2021 at 7:57 PM
To: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io>, "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

The attached paper describes PUE limitations and suggest other metrics to address them.

Hesham

On 4/12/2021 9:51 AM, Herb Zien wrote:

The PUE formula has flaws and can be gamed.  Power draw is not energy consumption. It is possible to pick a favorable time to read meters, when chillers are not operating for example, in order to make a facility appear more energy efficient than it really is.

 

Also, server fans, which can account for 20% of total rack power at full load, are treated as IT power and not cooling. This increases the denominator, thereby reducing PUE. For example, when data center temperatures are increased the central A/C energy draw might go down but rack fans will need to load up. The PUE goes down when total energy usage might increase.

 

Herb Zien

LiquidCool Solutions, Inc.

(414) 803-6010

 

From: OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Mitchell via groups.io
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2021 11:26 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

PUE is a decent metric above values of 1.20 (or there-abouts).  Key limitation is that improvements in ITE efficiency will cause PUE to increase (worsen) even as data center efficiency improves. 

This impact becomes of greater concern as PUE levels drop below 1.2, and/or use of liquid cooling becomes significant or use of high airflow/delta T in servers becomes significant (see ASHRAE TC9.9 discussions).

 

Each of the other metrics – CUE, WUE, ERE also have flaws that become of greater concern as you maximize sustainability (sort of a Heisenberg uncertainty principle of sustainability metrics)

 

Noble goals, would highlight need for metric maintenance.

 

Kind Regards & Keep Safe

 

Don Mitchell
Data Center Division Manager


Data Center Solutions page


+1-425-379-8335
Don.Mitchell@...

    

100 Years of Innovation - Forbes:  Victaulic’s Industrial Legacy…June 2019

Construction Tech Review – Top 10 BIM Consulting Services Companies:  “From preconstruction through installation, Victaulic provides a suite of services tailored to fit the project needs at every stage of the construction timeline

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of mark.dansie@...
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2021 9:07 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

John,

 

Thanks for your comments.

 

It’s interesting that you’ve mentioned PUE, because it is already one of the metrics listed in the Colo Site Assessment under the title of ‘Efficiency’.  I’ve always believed PUE to be a metric, albeit flawed, to measure data center efficiency rather than sustainability, and therefore I didn’t list it in my email below.

 

PUE is one of the metrics listed in the Colo Site Assessment under the title of ‘Efficiency’ alongside WUE and CUE.  To download a copy of the current OCP Ready colo site assessment go to the link below:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/17F2mGnfxdXLhqXKwc1wVtoQdPFbLRrlJsCsZ1laT3AQ/copy#gid=679407764

 

Being able to measure the Scope 3 emissions for the construction of a facility should be considered.

 

In many respects a colo isn’t any different from other types of data centers, but the request I’ve made for feedback is specifically for the OCP Ready™ Facility Recognition Program, which has been created for colocation solution providers.

 

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Wallerich
Sent: 12 April 2021 15:41
To: ocp-acf@ocp-all.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Mark,

 

It depends on what you're trying to measure.  I would think PUE would be useful but the question is, are you also considering embodied carbons or sustainability from a materials perspective of the facility itself.

 

Energy consumption, like IT load, is a Scope 2 carbon emission where embodied carbons measure Scope 3 emissions.

 

Per your question, when measuring sustainability from a carbon emissions standpoint, is a COLO any different than any other data center?

 

Regards,

 

John

 

On Mon, Apr 12, 2021 at 1:49 AM <mark.dansie@...> wrote:

Hi DCF Group,

 

I would like to get your feedback re: suitable metrics for measuring a colocation data center’s sustainability, that should be used as part of the OCP Ready program .

 

Within the current colo site assessment we have the below attributes that help to measure a data center’s sustainability:

 

  • Site WUE Monitoring
  • Site CUE Monitoring

 

It would be great to have your input on any other metrics that we should be considering, for inclusion in the next iteration of the colo site assessment and also the colo facility guidelines doc., such as Energy Reuse Effectiveness (ERE).

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 


mark.dansie@...
 

Hi John et al,

 

Thanks for bringing the conversation back around to where I started the thread, we seemed to have gone off on a fork re: data center efficiency and PUE, but a very interesting fork at that!

 

Clearly we have some interesting opinions and ideas within the community, it would be great to harness them in a workstream!

 

Please come along to the next DCF project call on the 21st April, would be good to know if anyone (as Gaby asked below) Who’s in to take this further’?

 

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Gross, PE, ATD
Sent: 14 April 2021 15:04
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

So I’ll throw my 2 center into the ring here –

The primary issue at hand is that the thread is titled “Sustainability Metrics”. Sustainability is power, water, carbon emissions, etc. If we want to talk about electrical power efficiency, the discussion becomes FAR more simplified, though still not simple. As many have mentioned, the efficiency of the compute itself (flops/watt, etc) factors into the “work” we get out of our power input. There aren’t many servers out there which will provide metrics on this. When you dive into the efficiency of the code, while I think that’s a fantastic way to understand the overall efficiency of the platform, who knows how to quantify that?

 

When you broaden your topic of discussion to “sustainability” from simply “power”, now you get into *how* the power is made, how the waste *energy* (electrical, heat, etc) is discharged (reused on site, off site, discharged to atmosphere?), the impact that discharged waste energy has on the environment in terms of carbon emissions, possible heat island effect, etc.

 

As much as I think the USGBC was misguided in a number of things, one thing I think they got close on what how to quantify the scarcity of a resource to the site – money. I don’t want to get into the politics of why money was used by USGBC, BUT, realistically market conditions adjust the cost of electricity, water and gas to an end user based on 2 primary factors – how scare the resource is, and how good the customer is at negotiating rates. If you adjust the consumption of the resource by the MARKET price (ie NOT the customers negotiated price), you can start to quantify how sustainable that facility is based on the resources it uses in its particular location, etc. For example, a low WUE is far more sustainably beneficial/responsible in Arizona than it is in Seattle.  

 

The last thing I’ll throw in here, because if we walk back to the power part of the discussion, it’ll be more clear – we need to get reporting of PUE back to what it was intended to be – the power consumed *to support the critical load* divided by the critical load. In other words, (IMO) when talking about a total facility we need to get rid of discussions about partial PUE, etc. Yes, UPS losses count against you. Yes, if you have a 2N power distribution with separate HVAC systems cooling each distribution, that goes in the numerator, etc. If you’re liquid cooling and have lower fan losses, you should get credit for that. I also think there should either be categories/bins or adjustment factors for facilities that don’t have redundancy requirements. For example, many crypto facilities don’t have UPSs, let alone multiple power paths, redundant cooling, etc. Their PUE will ALWAYS be lower all other things being equal than an enterprise or hyperscale in the same location. I see so many marketing releases that talk about the PUE in terms of just the (UPS Output + HVAC to whitespace) / UPS Output. *This is NOT PUE*. Parasitic loads that have to be energized to support the UPS load are in the numerator. As an industry we have allowed marketing folks to bastardize/dilute the metric, and if we want to have a single metric to use to help tell the story, we as an industry have a responsibility to maintain the integrity of that metric, otherwise it’s all just buzzwords and fancy numbers.

 

Thank you,

 

John Gross, PE, ATD

Owner, Mechanical Engineer

 

__________________________________________________________________

J. M. Gross Engineering, LLC              ENGINEERING

Richmond, TX 77406                           FACILITY ASSESSMENTS

Mobile: (832) 247-6671                     COMMISSIONING

__________________________________________________________________

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gaby Mindreci via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, April 14, 2021 3:08 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hi Jonathan and all group members,

 

The whole idea on this efficiency exercise was to find a metric which would instantly tell the story on how efficient a data center is, starting from the rack. Think of a fridge that has an Energy Star rating on the door. As a consumer, when shopping, you look at the energy star rating and use that metric to help you decide which fridge to buy.

 

For the data center, ideally you would have a measure which can indicate the total electrical power efficiency which can be segmented for each device as a relationship of how much comes in and how much gets out. Nothing else.

 

Why is this such a difficult task to accomplish and why are there so many different opinions on how to measure either efficiency or effectiveness or whatever we may want to call it?

 

…I am going to share a couple of reflections with the community at the risk to receive some criticism but the objective is to stimulate renewed interest to the topic.

 

With background into aerospace applications, my mind takes me to how straight forward it is to define and interpret the efficiency ratings on aircraft and why is that? It is because the relationship between input and output is easily quantifiable as they are both physical entities and therefore the ratio between fuel consumed and distance or load is clear as day.

 

To take the thought further, if we look at lean manufacturing concepts used in industry, again the ratio between effort in and output is easily quantifiable because both entities are physical. The objective is always to put less in and get more out….

 

And hereby comes the point: In our evolution, humanity is faced for the very first time with a new type of challenge where the resulting output of an extremely complex aggregate is not physical, it is completely virtual. And to make matters worse, the physical output is a completely unwanted entity: low, low-grade heat that offers no benefit and requires even more energy to channel it away.

 

In reality, the data center, ladies and gentlemen, is a HEAT factory:

Diagram

Description automatically generated

 

If we recognize this, we need to step aside and think….  Oh, wait, how much energy is used by the brain to think?... lol

 

 

So how can we truly quantify efficiency? A ratio of total power in to total heat out? But this means there is no value indicator related to the amount of virtual output so we are back to square one.

 

Think of this: is it possible that we are now at the early stages of another kind of evolutionary process and just like nature already figured it out, the data center should not exist as a stand-alone entity and maybe it should be a synergistic part of another process which actually yields a physical output? Or a process which captures all the heat to regenerate power rather than letting it all go out into the atmosphere?

 

Is it possible that one day, all this low-grade residual heat becomes a commodity for which competitive bidding takes place?

 

Who’s in to take this further?

 

 

Kind regards,

MINDREACH | imagination 2 innovation | www.m-i2i.com

+33 6 33 08 50 62

 

 

From: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of Jonathan Evans <j.evans@...>
Reply-To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, April 14, 2021 at 8:33 AM
To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io>, "OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hi all,

 

Very interesting discussion. I may not have read all the emails though,  I have a PUE conundrum.

 

We work with Green Revolution Cooling. Immersion cooling solutions.

 

If you have a server load of 1000kW and you remove the fans to immerse them the ‘IT load’  load drops by 10-15%.

 

The only power you need for the immersion cooling is that 10-15% for the pumps. No other cooling load.

 

So what is the PUE?

 

I also work with EcoDataCenter and they are the first facility to show detailed cardon calculations to show they are ‘climate positive’.  Measuring a datacenter carbon footprint including embedded carbon in the servers might be the way forward.

https://ecodatacenter.se/why-ecodatacenter/climate-calculation/

 

Regards

 

Jonathan H. Evans

Director

                    

 

T:  +44(0)7736742797

Ej.evans@...

W: www.totaldatacentresolutions.co.uk

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gaby Mindreci
Sent: 13 April 2021 15:29
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hi John,

 

Everything you say makes sense. This is why I always thought maybe this metric might have merit if taken backwards, from billing. All services are billed right? And if they are billed, then they are measured. And on the same token, power coming in is metered accordingly so therefore theoretically there is a way. We would need to have conventions on north-south, east-west movements, then the relationship of power to stored data, etc.

 

The purpose of knowing how far a watt could go, is to stimulate a race for efficiency. There are plenty of opportunities to improve efficiency (in my presentation, I used an example on connectors which are benign passive components).

Some global locations already really struggle with the amount of power available to their facilities and as this demand goes up, a crisis will soon emerge. Think of power availability to island nations, their infrastructure is heavily dependent on fossil fuel generation and with power demands for computing growing at current rates, it is only a matter of time to recognize in fact that these are the early signs on what is to follow at full global scale.

 

Technology needs to step-up so we are able to meet the needs of the computing industry 10 to 20 years into the future. The efficiency metric is needed to raise awareness, provide easy and instinctive feel on what that efficiency means and to stimulate competition.

 

Kind regards, Gaby Mindreci

MINDREACH | imagination 2 innovation | www.m-i2i.com

+33 6 33 08 50 62

 

 

From: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of John Wallerich <john.wallerich@...>
Reply-To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, April 13, 2021 at 3:33 PM
To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io>, "OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Gaby,

 

Measuring the amount of data processed per kWh is a daunting challenge.  Many years ago while at Intel we tried to develop an easy to use method, but given the complexity of the challenge we never succeeded.  We didn't look at how much data could be processed as that was just one function of a server, and what does "process" mean.

 

John Pflueger of Dell (and Green Grid leader) developed a metric of watts per transaction, a transaction being a much more uniform and measurable metric.  It wasn't perfect, but it was much simpler to use.  Yet today we still struggle to measure the practical benefit of a Watt consumed.  

 

I served in the Green Grid committee that published PUE, and I authored the first paper on DCiE.  We knew the industry would abuse PUE, and they have.  But it has still had a significant impact as it focused on the one area we could affect, the facilities infrastructure.  But at the end of the day, the only metric that really matters is reducing total site power.  I'm not convinced that pursuing the benefit/Watt ratio is feasible or meaningful given the myriad of variables.   A good debate topic though.

 

Regards,

 

John Wallerich

Chief Solutions Officer 

408-718-2443

 

On Tue, Apr 13, 2021 at 12:12 AM Gaby Mindreci <gaby@...> wrote:

Hello to all,

 

For those who are new to the group, we started a similar discussion one year ago trying to find direction in adopting a realistic metric such as GB of data processed per kWh of power into the data center.

The first attachment was the initial teaser. In the second, I combined various references and since then I accumulated many others. It is clear that the OCP community believes that PUE is not an efficiency indicator but it appears a hard metric with a detailed determination method will not arise unless a specific project is started and some actual effort goes in it.

 

I also did the Data Center Metrics Deficiency presentation at the Tech Week in November. See the last attachment. Slide 6 shows where the significant power losses occur in the power distribution infrastructure. This is a good area to map and define to start with. In addition to this, the elephant in the room is the power used for cooling. This is an area where there is a lot of opportunity for innovation and new technology.

 

Many in this audience and within the OCP community believe in a metric such as GB/kWh and it is a metric that can be assigned to one rack, to a row and a complete data center as well. The challenge is to define the method.

 

Kind regards, Gaby Mindreci

MINDREACH | imagination 2 innovation | www.m-i2i.com

+33 6 33 08 50 62

 

 

From: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of Hesham <helbakoury@...>
Reply-To: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Monday, April 12, 2021 at 7:57 PM
To: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io>, "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

The attached paper describes PUE limitations and suggest other metrics to address them.

Hesham

On 4/12/2021 9:51 AM, Herb Zien wrote:

The PUE formula has flaws and can be gamed.  Power draw is not energy consumption. It is possible to pick a favorable time to read meters, when chillers are not operating for example, in order to make a facility appear more energy efficient than it really is.

 

Also, server fans, which can account for 20% of total rack power at full load, are treated as IT power and not cooling. This increases the denominator, thereby reducing PUE. For example, when data center temperatures are increased the central A/C energy draw might go down but rack fans will need to load up. The PUE goes down when total energy usage might increase.

 

Herb Zien

LiquidCool Solutions, Inc.

(414) 803-6010

 

From: OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Mitchell via groups.io
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2021 11:26 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

PUE is a decent metric above values of 1.20 (or there-abouts).  Key limitation is that improvements in ITE efficiency will cause PUE to increase (worsen) even as data center efficiency improves. 

This impact becomes of greater concern as PUE levels drop below 1.2, and/or use of liquid cooling becomes significant or use of high airflow/delta T in servers becomes significant (see ASHRAE TC9.9 discussions).

 

Each of the other metrics – CUE, WUE, ERE also have flaws that become of greater concern as you maximize sustainability (sort of a Heisenberg uncertainty principle of sustainability metrics)

 

Noble goals, would highlight need for metric maintenance.

 

Kind Regards & Keep Safe

 

Don Mitchell
Data Center Division Manager


Data Center Solutions page


+1-425-379-8335
Don.Mitchell@...

    

100 Years of Innovation - Forbes:  Victaulic’s Industrial Legacy…June 2019

Construction Tech Review – Top 10 BIM Consulting Services Companies:  “From preconstruction through installation, Victaulic provides a suite of services tailored to fit the project needs at every stage of the construction timeline

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of mark.dansie@...
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2021 9:07 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

John,

 

Thanks for your comments.

 

It’s interesting that you’ve mentioned PUE, because it is already one of the metrics listed in the Colo Site Assessment under the title of ‘Efficiency’.  I’ve always believed PUE to be a metric, albeit flawed, to measure data center efficiency rather than sustainability, and therefore I didn’t list it in my email below.

 

PUE is one of the metrics listed in the Colo Site Assessment under the title of ‘Efficiency’ alongside WUE and CUE.  To download a copy of the current OCP Ready colo site assessment go to the link below:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/17F2mGnfxdXLhqXKwc1wVtoQdPFbLRrlJsCsZ1laT3AQ/copy#gid=679407764

 

Being able to measure the Scope 3 emissions for the construction of a facility should be considered.

 

In many respects a colo isn’t any different from other types of data centers, but the request I’ve made for feedback is specifically for the OCP Ready™ Facility Recognition Program, which has been created for colocation solution providers.

 

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Wallerich
Sent: 12 April 2021 15:41
To: ocp-acf@ocp-all.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Mark,

 

It depends on what you're trying to measure.  I would think PUE would be useful but the question is, are you also considering embodied carbons or sustainability from a materials perspective of the facility itself.

 

Energy consumption, like IT load, is a Scope 2 carbon emission where embodied carbons measure Scope 3 emissions.

 

Per your question, when measuring sustainability from a carbon emissions standpoint, is a COLO any different than any other data center?

 

Regards,

 

John

 

On Mon, Apr 12, 2021 at 1:49 AM <mark.dansie@...> wrote:

Hi DCF Group,

 

I would like to get your feedback re: suitable metrics for measuring a colocation data center’s sustainability, that should be used as part of the OCP Ready program .

 

Within the current colo site assessment we have the below attributes that help to measure a data center’s sustainability:

 

  • Site WUE Monitoring
  • Site CUE Monitoring

 

It would be great to have your input on any other metrics that we should be considering, for inclusion in the next iteration of the colo site assessment and also the colo facility guidelines doc., such as Energy Reuse Effectiveness (ERE).

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 


Herb Zien <Herb.Zien@...>
 

Jonathon,

You identified a significant problem with the PUE equation, which is defined as Total Facility Power / IT Power.  In the case of immersion cooling pumping power and fans to run the dry cooler appear in the numerator but not the denominator. For air-cooled servers, however, server fans are treated as IT power and the energy to run them, which can represent up to 20% of total server power, is included in the numerator and denominator, which tilts the equation toward air cooling even though more energy is consumed.

 

Herb Zien

LiquidCool Solutions, Inc.

(414) 803-6010

 

From: OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jonathan Evans via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, April 14, 2021 1:33 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hi all,

 

Very interesting discussion. I may not have read all the emails though,  I have a PUE conundrum.

 

We work with Green Revolution Cooling. Immersion cooling solutions.

 

If you have a server load of 1000kW and you remove the fans to immerse them the ‘IT load’  load drops by 10-15%.

 

The only power you need for the immersion cooling is that 10-15% for the pumps. No other cooling load.

 

So what is the PUE?

 

I also work with EcoDataCenter and they are the first facility to show detailed cardon calculations to show they are ‘climate positive’.  Measuring a datacenter carbon footprint including embedded carbon in the servers might be the way forward.

https://ecodatacenter.se/why-ecodatacenter/climate-calculation/

 

Regards

 

Jonathan H. Evans

Director

                    

 

T:  +44(0)7736742797

Ej.evans@...

W: www.totaldatacentresolutions.co.uk

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gaby Mindreci
Sent: 13 April 2021 15:29
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hi John,

 

Everything you say makes sense. This is why I always thought maybe this metric might have merit if taken backwards, from billing. All services are billed right? And if they are billed, then they are measured. And on the same token, power coming in is metered accordingly so therefore theoretically there is a way. We would need to have conventions on north-south, east-west movements, then the relationship of power to stored data, etc.

 

The purpose of knowing how far a watt could go, is to stimulate a race for efficiency. There are plenty of opportunities to improve efficiency (in my presentation, I used an example on connectors which are benign passive components).

Some global locations already really struggle with the amount of power available to their facilities and as this demand goes up, a crisis will soon emerge. Think of power availability to island nations, their infrastructure is heavily dependent on fossil fuel generation and with power demands for computing growing at current rates, it is only a matter of time to recognize in fact that these are the early signs on what is to follow at full global scale.

 

Technology needs to step-up so we are able to meet the needs of the computing industry 10 to 20 years into the future. The efficiency metric is needed to raise awareness, provide easy and instinctive feel on what that efficiency means and to stimulate competition.

 

Kind regards, Gaby Mindreci

MINDREACH | imagination 2 innovation | www.m-i2i.com

+33 6 33 08 50 62

 

 

From: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of John Wallerich <john.wallerich@...>
Reply-To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, April 13, 2021 at 3:33 PM
To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io>, "OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Gaby,

 

Measuring the amount of data processed per kWh is a daunting challenge.  Many years ago while at Intel we tried to develop an easy to use method, but given the complexity of the challenge we never succeeded.  We didn't look at how much data could be processed as that was just one function of a server, and what does "process" mean.

 

John Pflueger of Dell (and Green Grid leader) developed a metric of watts per transaction, a transaction being a much more uniform and measurable metric.  It wasn't perfect, but it was much simpler to use.  Yet today we still struggle to measure the practical benefit of a Watt consumed.  

 

I served in the Green Grid committee that published PUE, and I authored the first paper on DCiE.  We knew the industry would abuse PUE, and they have.  But it has still had a significant impact as it focused on the one area we could affect, the facilities infrastructure.  But at the end of the day, the only metric that really matters is reducing total site power.  I'm not convinced that pursuing the benefit/Watt ratio is feasible or meaningful given the myriad of variables.   A good debate topic though.

 

Regards,

 

John Wallerich

Chief Solutions Officer 

408-718-2443

 

On Tue, Apr 13, 2021 at 12:12 AM Gaby Mindreci <gaby@...> wrote:

Hello to all,

 

For those who are new to the group, we started a similar discussion one year ago trying to find direction in adopting a realistic metric such as GB of data processed per kWh of power into the data center.

The first attachment was the initial teaser. In the second, I combined various references and since then I accumulated many others. It is clear that the OCP community believes that PUE is not an efficiency indicator but it appears a hard metric with a detailed determination method will not arise unless a specific project is started and some actual effort goes in it.

 

I also did the Data Center Metrics Deficiency presentation at the Tech Week in November. See the last attachment. Slide 6 shows where the significant power losses occur in the power distribution infrastructure. This is a good area to map and define to start with. In addition to this, the elephant in the room is the power used for cooling. This is an area where there is a lot of opportunity for innovation and new technology.

 

Many in this audience and within the OCP community believe in a metric such as GB/kWh and it is a metric that can be assigned to one rack, to a row and a complete data center as well. The challenge is to define the method.

 

Kind regards, Gaby Mindreci

MINDREACH | imagination 2 innovation | www.m-i2i.com

+33 6 33 08 50 62

 

 

From: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of Hesham <helbakoury@...>
Reply-To: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Monday, April 12, 2021 at 7:57 PM
To: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io>, "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

The attached paper describes PUE limitations and suggest other metrics to address them.

Hesham

On 4/12/2021 9:51 AM, Herb Zien wrote:

The PUE formula has flaws and can be gamed.  Power draw is not energy consumption. It is possible to pick a favorable time to read meters, when chillers are not operating for example, in order to make a facility appear more energy efficient than it really is.

 

Also, server fans, which can account for 20% of total rack power at full load, are treated as IT power and not cooling. This increases the denominator, thereby reducing PUE. For example, when data center temperatures are increased the central A/C energy draw might go down but rack fans will need to load up. The PUE goes down when total energy usage might increase.

 

Herb Zien

LiquidCool Solutions, Inc.

(414) 803-6010

 

From: OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Mitchell via groups.io
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2021 11:26 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

PUE is a decent metric above values of 1.20 (or there-abouts).  Key limitation is that improvements in ITE efficiency will cause PUE to increase (worsen) even as data center efficiency improves. 

This impact becomes of greater concern as PUE levels drop below 1.2, and/or use of liquid cooling becomes significant or use of high airflow/delta T in servers becomes significant (see ASHRAE TC9.9 discussions).

 

Each of the other metrics – CUE, WUE, ERE also have flaws that become of greater concern as you maximize sustainability (sort of a Heisenberg uncertainty principle of sustainability metrics)

 

Noble goals, would highlight need for metric maintenance.

 

Kind Regards & Keep Safe

 

Don Mitchell
Data Center Division Manager


Data Center Solutions page


+1-425-379-8335
Don.Mitchell@...

    

100 Years of Innovation - Forbes:  Victaulic’s Industrial Legacy…June 2019

Construction Tech Review – Top 10 BIM Consulting Services Companies:  “From preconstruction through installation, Victaulic provides a suite of services tailored to fit the project needs at every stage of the construction timeline

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of mark.dansie@...
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2021 9:07 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

John,

 

Thanks for your comments.

 

It’s interesting that you’ve mentioned PUE, because it is already one of the metrics listed in the Colo Site Assessment under the title of ‘Efficiency’.  I’ve always believed PUE to be a metric, albeit flawed, to measure data center efficiency rather than sustainability, and therefore I didn’t list it in my email below.

 

PUE is one of the metrics listed in the Colo Site Assessment under the title of ‘Efficiency’ alongside WUE and CUE.  To download a copy of the current OCP Ready colo site assessment go to the link below:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/17F2mGnfxdXLhqXKwc1wVtoQdPFbLRrlJsCsZ1laT3AQ/copy#gid=679407764

 

Being able to measure the Scope 3 emissions for the construction of a facility should be considered.

 

In many respects a colo isn’t any different from other types of data centers, but the request I’ve made for feedback is specifically for the OCP Ready™ Facility Recognition Program, which has been created for colocation solution providers.

 

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Wallerich
Sent: 12 April 2021 15:41
To: ocp-acf@ocp-all.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Mark,

 

It depends on what you're trying to measure.  I would think PUE would be useful but the question is, are you also considering embodied carbons or sustainability from a materials perspective of the facility itself.

 

Energy consumption, like IT load, is a Scope 2 carbon emission where embodied carbons measure Scope 3 emissions.

 

Per your question, when measuring sustainability from a carbon emissions standpoint, is a COLO any different than any other data center?

 

Regards,

 

John

 

On Mon, Apr 12, 2021 at 1:49 AM <mark.dansie@...> wrote:

Hi DCF Group,

 

I would like to get your feedback re: suitable metrics for measuring a colocation data center’s sustainability, that should be used as part of the OCP Ready program .

 

Within the current colo site assessment we have the below attributes that help to measure a data center’s sustainability:

 

  • Site WUE Monitoring
  • Site CUE Monitoring

 

It would be great to have your input on any other metrics that we should be considering, for inclusion in the next iteration of the colo site assessment and also the colo facility guidelines doc., such as Energy Reuse Effectiveness (ERE).

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 


David Gyulnazaryan
 

Hi all,
I want to share just two slides from my presentation, where I explain to customers the difference between PUE and real energy consumption for air cooled servers and on chip cooling solution. So, even in 4 case(with loop heat pipe on chips) we have lowest PUE in fact whole data center energy consumption is for 4% lower than conventional IT-load (servers with fans). So, for advanced cooling solution we can specify the servers fans energy consumption as separate part of IT-load.

Встроенное изображение

Встроенное изображение

David Gyulnazaryan
mob. France +33 7 76 23 53 77
mob. UK +44 20 3286 1654
E-mail: david_gyulnazaryan@...
Skype: davidkras
 


среда, 14 апреля 2021 г., 21:06:30 GMT+2, Herb Zien <herb.zien@...> написал(-а):


Jonathon,

You identified a significant problem with the PUE equation, which is defined as Total Facility Power / IT Power.  In the case of immersion cooling pumping power and fans to run the dry cooler appear in the numerator but not the denominator. For air-cooled servers, however, server fans are treated as IT power and the energy to run them, which can represent up to 20% of total server power, is included in the numerator and denominator, which tilts the equation toward air cooling even though more energy is consumed.

 

Herb Zien

LiquidCool Solutions, Inc.

(414) 803-6010

 

From: OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jonathan Evans via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, April 14, 2021 1:33 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hi all,

 

Very interesting discussion. I may not have read all the emails though,  I have a PUE conundrum.

 

We work with Green Revolution Cooling. Immersion cooling solutions.

 

If you have a server load of 1000kW and you remove the fans to immerse them the ‘IT load’  load drops by 10-15%.

 

The only power you need for the immersion cooling is that 10-15% for the pumps. No other cooling load.

 

So what is the PUE?

 

I also work with EcoDataCenter and they are the first facility to show detailed cardon calculations to show they are ‘climate positive’.  Measuring a datacenter carbon footprint including embedded carbon in the servers might be the way forward.

https://ecodatacenter.se/why-ecodatacenter/climate-calculation/

 

Regards

 

Jonathan H. Evans

Director

                    

 

T:  +44(0)7736742797

Ej.evans@...

W: www.totaldatacentresolutions.co.uk

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gaby Mindreci
Sent: 13 April 2021 15:29
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hi John,

 

Everything you say makes sense. This is why I always thought maybe this metric might have merit if taken backwards, from billing. All services are billed right? And if they are billed, then they are measured. And on the same token, power coming in is metered accordingly so therefore theoretically there is a way. We would need to have conventions on north-south, east-west movements, then the relationship of power to stored data, etc.

 

The purpose of knowing how far a watt could go, is to stimulate a race for efficiency. There are plenty of opportunities to improve efficiency (in my presentation, I used an example on connectors which are benign passive components).

Some global locations already really struggle with the amount of power available to their facilities and as this demand goes up, a crisis will soon emerge. Think of power availability to island nations, their infrastructure is heavily dependent on fossil fuel generation and with power demands for computing growing at current rates, it is only a matter of time to recognize in fact that these are the early signs on what is to follow at full global scale.

 

Technology needs to step-up so we are able to meet the needs of the computing industry 10 to 20 years into the future. The efficiency metric is needed to raise awareness, provide easy and instinctive feel on what that efficiency means and to stimulate competition.

 

Kind regards, Gaby Mindreci

MINDREACH | imagination 2 innovation | www.m-i2i.com

+33 6 33 08 50 62

 

 

From: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of John Wallerich <john.wallerich@...>
Reply-To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, April 13, 2021 at 3:33 PM
To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io>, "OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Gaby,

 

Measuring the amount of data processed per kWh is a daunting challenge.  Many years ago while at Intel we tried to develop an easy to use method, but given the complexity of the challenge we never succeeded.  We didn't look at how much data could be processed as that was just one function of a server, and what does "process" mean.

 

John Pflueger of Dell (and Green Grid leader) developed a metric of watts per transaction, a transaction being a much more uniform and measurable metric.  It wasn't perfect, but it was much simpler to use.  Yet today we still struggle to measure the practical benefit of a Watt consumed.  

 

I served in the Green Grid committee that published PUE, and I authored the first paper on DCiE.  We knew the industry would abuse PUE, and they have.  But it has still had a significant impact as it focused on the one area we could affect, the facilities infrastructure.  But at the end of the day, the only metric that really matters is reducing total site power.  I'm not convinced that pursuing the benefit/Watt ratio is feasible or meaningful given the myriad of variables.   A good debate topic though.

 

Regards,

 

John Wallerich

Chief Solutions Officer 

408-718-2443

Image removed by sender.

 

On Tue, Apr 13, 2021 at 12:12 AM Gaby Mindreci <gaby@...> wrote:

Hello to all,

 

For those who are new to the group, we started a similar discussion one year ago trying to find direction in adopting a realistic metric such as GB of data processed per kWh of power into the data center.

The first attachment was the initial teaser. In the second, I combined various references and since then I accumulated many others. It is clear that the OCP community believes that PUE is not an efficiency indicator but it appears a hard metric with a detailed determination method will not arise unless a specific project is started and some actual effort goes in it.

 

I also did the Data Center Metrics Deficiency presentation at the Tech Week in November. See the last attachment. Slide 6 shows where the significant power losses occur in the power distribution infrastructure. This is a good area to map and define to start with. In addition to this, the elephant in the room is the power used for cooling. This is an area where there is a lot of opportunity for innovation and new technology.

 

Many in this audience and within the OCP community believe in a metric such as GB/kWh and it is a metric that can be assigned to one rack, to a row and a complete data center as well. The challenge is to define the method.

 

Kind regards, Gaby Mindreci

MINDREACH | imagination 2 innovation | www.m-i2i.com

+33 6 33 08 50 62

 

 

From: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of Hesham <helbakoury@...>
Reply-To: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Monday, April 12, 2021 at 7:57 PM
To: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io>, "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

The attached paper describes PUE limitations and suggest other metrics to address them.

Hesham

On 4/12/2021 9:51 AM, Herb Zien wrote:

The PUE formula has flaws and can be gamed.  Power draw is not energy consumption. It is possible to pick a favorable time to read meters, when chillers are not operating for example, in order to make a facility appear more energy efficient than it really is.

 

Also, server fans, which can account for 20% of total rack power at full load, are treated as IT power and not cooling. This increases the denominator, thereby reducing PUE. For example, when data center temperatures are increased the central A/C energy draw might go down but rack fans will need to load up. The PUE goes down when total energy usage might increase.

 

Herb Zien

LiquidCool Solutions, Inc.

(414) 803-6010

 

From: OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Mitchell via groups.io
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2021 11:26 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

PUE is a decent metric above values of 1.20 (or there-abouts).  Key limitation is that improvements in ITE efficiency will cause PUE to increase (worsen) even as data center efficiency improves. 

This impact becomes of greater concern as PUE levels drop below 1.2, and/or use of liquid cooling becomes significant or use of high airflow/delta T in servers becomes significant (see ASHRAE TC9.9 discussions).

 

Each of the other metrics – CUE, WUE, ERE also have flaws that become of greater concern as you maximize sustainability (sort of a Heisenberg uncertainty principle of sustainability metrics)

 

Noble goals, would highlight need for metric maintenance.

 

Kind Regards & Keep Safe

 

Don Mitchell
Data Center Division Manager


Data Center Solutions page


+1-425-379-8335
Don.Mitchell@...

    

100 Years of Innovation - Forbes:  Victaulic’s Industrial Legacy…June 2019

Construction Tech Review – Top 10 BIM Consulting Services Companies:  “From preconstruction through installation, Victaulic provides a suite of services tailored to fit the project needs at every stage of the construction timeline

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of mark.dansie@...
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2021 9:07 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

John,

 

Thanks for your comments.

 

It’s interesting that you’ve mentioned PUE, because it is already one of the metrics listed in the Colo Site Assessment under the title of ‘Efficiency’.  I’ve always believed PUE to be a metric, albeit flawed, to measure data center efficiency rather than sustainability, and therefore I didn’t list it in my email below.

 

PUE is one of the metrics listed in the Colo Site Assessment under the title of ‘Efficiency’ alongside WUE and CUE.  To download a copy of the current OCP Ready colo site assessment go to the link below:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/17F2mGnfxdXLhqXKwc1wVtoQdPFbLRrlJsCsZ1laT3AQ/copy#gid=679407764

 

Being able to measure the Scope 3 emissions for the construction of a facility should be considered.

 

In many respects a colo isn’t any different from other types of data centers, but the request I’ve made for feedback is specifically for the OCP Ready™ Facility Recognition Program, which has been created for colocation solution providers.

 

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Wallerich
Sent: 12 April 2021 15:41
To: ocp-acf@ocp-all.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Mark,

 

It depends on what you're trying to measure.  I would think PUE would be useful but the question is, are you also considering embodied carbons or sustainability from a materials perspective of the facility itself.

 

Energy consumption, like IT load, is a Scope 2 carbon emission where embodied carbons measure Scope 3 emissions.

 

Per your question, when measuring sustainability from a carbon emissions standpoint, is a COLO any different than any other data center?

 

Regards,

 

John

 

On Mon, Apr 12, 2021 at 1:49 AM <mark.dansie@...> wrote:

Hi DCF Group,

 

I would like to get your feedback re: suitable metrics for measuring a colocation data center’s sustainability, that should be used as part of the OCP Ready program .

 

Within the current colo site assessment we have the below attributes that help to measure a data center’s sustainability:

 

  • Site WUE Monitoring
  • Site CUE Monitoring

 

It would be great to have your input on any other metrics that we should be considering, for inclusion in the next iteration of the colo site assessment and also the colo facility guidelines doc., such as Energy Reuse Effectiveness (ERE).

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 


mark.dansie@...
 

Hi All,

 

I just want to add John Laban’s (OCP representative in Europe) two pennies worth into the ring as well, please watch the short video below that has just been posted on the NORDIC Datacenter Forum website:

 

       

DECARBONISATION OF DATA CENTRES THROUGH OPEN SOURCE INNOVATIONS

 

https://www.datacenter-forum.com/ocp-foundation/decarbonisation-of-data-centres-through-open-source-innovations

 

 

Would be great to hear your comments / views on whether you agree with John…?

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 

 

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Gross, PE, ATD
Sent: 14 April 2021 15:04
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

So I’ll throw my 2 center into the ring here –

The primary issue at hand is that the thread is titled “Sustainability Metrics”. Sustainability is power, water, carbon emissions, etc. If we want to talk about electrical power efficiency, the discussion becomes FAR more simplified, though still not simple. As many have mentioned, the efficiency of the compute itself (flops/watt, etc) factors into the “work” we get out of our power input. There aren’t many servers out there which will provide metrics on this. When you dive into the efficiency of the code, while I think that’s a fantastic way to understand the overall efficiency of the platform, who knows how to quantify that?

 

When you broaden your topic of discussion to “sustainability” from simply “power”, now you get into *how* the power is made, how the waste *energy* (electrical, heat, etc) is discharged (reused on site, off site, discharged to atmosphere?), the impact that discharged waste energy has on the environment in terms of carbon emissions, possible heat island effect, etc.

 

As much as I think the USGBC was misguided in a number of things, one thing I think they got close on what how to quantify the scarcity of a resource to the site – money. I don’t want to get into the politics of why money was used by USGBC, BUT, realistically market conditions adjust the cost of electricity, water and gas to an end user based on 2 primary factors – how scare the resource is, and how good the customer is at negotiating rates. If you adjust the consumption of the resource by the MARKET price (ie NOT the customers negotiated price), you can start to quantify how sustainable that facility is based on the resources it uses in its particular location, etc. For example, a low WUE is far more sustainably beneficial/responsible in Arizona than it is in Seattle.  

 

The last thing I’ll throw in here, because if we walk back to the power part of the discussion, it’ll be more clear – we need to get reporting of PUE back to what it was intended to be – the power consumed *to support the critical load* divided by the critical load. In other words, (IMO) when talking about a total facility we need to get rid of discussions about partial PUE, etc. Yes, UPS losses count against you. Yes, if you have a 2N power distribution with separate HVAC systems cooling each distribution, that goes in the numerator, etc. If you’re liquid cooling and have lower fan losses, you should get credit for that. I also think there should either be categories/bins or adjustment factors for facilities that don’t have redundancy requirements. For example, many crypto facilities don’t have UPSs, let alone multiple power paths, redundant cooling, etc. Their PUE will ALWAYS be lower all other things being equal than an enterprise or hyperscale in the same location. I see so many marketing releases that talk about the PUE in terms of just the (UPS Output + HVAC to whitespace) / UPS Output. *This is NOT PUE*. Parasitic loads that have to be energized to support the UPS load are in the numerator. As an industry we have allowed marketing folks to bastardize/dilute the metric, and if we want to have a single metric to use to help tell the story, we as an industry have a responsibility to maintain the integrity of that metric, otherwise it’s all just buzzwords and fancy numbers.

 

Thank you,

 

John Gross, PE, ATD

Owner, Mechanical Engineer

 

__________________________________________________________________

J. M. Gross Engineering, LLC              ENGINEERING

Richmond, TX 77406                           FACILITY ASSESSMENTS

Mobile: (832) 247-6671                     COMMISSIONING

__________________________________________________________________

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gaby Mindreci via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, April 14, 2021 3:08 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hi Jonathan and all group members,

 

The whole idea on this efficiency exercise was to find a metric which would instantly tell the story on how efficient a data center is, starting from the rack. Think of a fridge that has an Energy Star rating on the door. As a consumer, when shopping, you look at the energy star rating and use that metric to help you decide which fridge to buy.

 

For the data center, ideally you would have a measure which can indicate the total electrical power efficiency which can be segmented for each device as a relationship of how much comes in and how much gets out. Nothing else.

 

Why is this such a difficult task to accomplish and why are there so many different opinions on how to measure either efficiency or effectiveness or whatever we may want to call it?

 

…I am going to share a couple of reflections with the community at the risk to receive some criticism but the objective is to stimulate renewed interest to the topic.

 

With background into aerospace applications, my mind takes me to how straight forward it is to define and interpret the efficiency ratings on aircraft and why is that? It is because the relationship between input and output is easily quantifiable as they are both physical entities and therefore the ratio between fuel consumed and distance or load is clear as day.

 

To take the thought further, if we look at lean manufacturing concepts used in industry, again the ratio between effort in and output is easily quantifiable because both entities are physical. The objective is always to put less in and get more out….

 

And hereby comes the point: In our evolution, humanity is faced for the very first time with a new type of challenge where the resulting output of an extremely complex aggregate is not physical, it is completely virtual. And to make matters worse, the physical output is a completely unwanted entity: low, low-grade heat that offers no benefit and requires even more energy to channel it away.

 

In reality, the data center, ladies and gentlemen, is a HEAT factory:

Diagram

Description automatically generated

 

If we recognize this, we need to step aside and think….  Oh, wait, how much energy is used by the brain to think?... lol

 

 

So how can we truly quantify efficiency? A ratio of total power in to total heat out? But this means there is no value indicator related to the amount of virtual output so we are back to square one.

 

Think of this: is it possible that we are now at the early stages of another kind of evolutionary process and just like nature already figured it out, the data center should not exist as a stand-alone entity and maybe it should be a synergistic part of another process which actually yields a physical output? Or a process which captures all the heat to regenerate power rather than letting it all go out into the atmosphere?

 

Is it possible that one day, all this low-grade residual heat becomes a commodity for which competitive bidding takes place?

 

Who’s in to take this further?

 

 

Kind regards,

MINDREACH | imagination 2 innovation | www.m-i2i.com

+33 6 33 08 50 62

 

 

From: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of Jonathan Evans <j.evans@...>
Reply-To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, April 14, 2021 at 8:33 AM
To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io>, "OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hi all,

 

Very interesting discussion. I may not have read all the emails though,  I have a PUE conundrum.

 

We work with Green Revolution Cooling. Immersion cooling solutions.

 

If you have a server load of 1000kW and you remove the fans to immerse them the ‘IT load’  load drops by 10-15%.

 

The only power you need for the immersion cooling is that 10-15% for the pumps. No other cooling load.

 

So what is the PUE?

 

I also work with EcoDataCenter and they are the first facility to show detailed cardon calculations to show they are ‘climate positive’.  Measuring a datacenter carbon footprint including embedded carbon in the servers might be the way forward.

https://ecodatacenter.se/why-ecodatacenter/climate-calculation/

 

Regards

 

Jonathan H. Evans

Director

                    

 

T:  +44(0)7736742797

Ej.evans@...

W: www.totaldatacentresolutions.co.uk

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gaby Mindreci
Sent: 13 April 2021 15:29
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hi John,

 

Everything you say makes sense. This is why I always thought maybe this metric might have merit if taken backwards, from billing. All services are billed right? And if they are billed, then they are measured. And on the same token, power coming in is metered accordingly so therefore theoretically there is a way. We would need to have conventions on north-south, east-west movements, then the relationship of power to stored data, etc.

 

The purpose of knowing how far a watt could go, is to stimulate a race for efficiency. There are plenty of opportunities to improve efficiency (in my presentation, I used an example on connectors which are benign passive components).

Some global locations already really struggle with the amount of power available to their facilities and as this demand goes up, a crisis will soon emerge. Think of power availability to island nations, their infrastructure is heavily dependent on fossil fuel generation and with power demands for computing growing at current rates, it is only a matter of time to recognize in fact that these are the early signs on what is to follow at full global scale.

 

Technology needs to step-up so we are able to meet the needs of the computing industry 10 to 20 years into the future. The efficiency metric is needed to raise awareness, provide easy and instinctive feel on what that efficiency means and to stimulate competition.

 

Kind regards, Gaby Mindreci

MINDREACH | imagination 2 innovation | www.m-i2i.com

+33 6 33 08 50 62

 

 

From: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of John Wallerich <john.wallerich@...>
Reply-To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, April 13, 2021 at 3:33 PM
To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io>, "OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Gaby,

 

Measuring the amount of data processed per kWh is a daunting challenge.  Many years ago while at Intel we tried to develop an easy to use method, but given the complexity of the challenge we never succeeded.  We didn't look at how much data could be processed as that was just one function of a server, and what does "process" mean.

 

John Pflueger of Dell (and Green Grid leader) developed a metric of watts per transaction, a transaction being a much more uniform and measurable metric.  It wasn't perfect, but it was much simpler to use.  Yet today we still struggle to measure the practical benefit of a Watt consumed.  

 

I served in the Green Grid committee that published PUE, and I authored the first paper on DCiE.  We knew the industry would abuse PUE, and they have.  But it has still had a significant impact as it focused on the one area we could affect, the facilities infrastructure.  But at the end of the day, the only metric that really matters is reducing total site power.  I'm not convinced that pursuing the benefit/Watt ratio is feasible or meaningful given the myriad of variables.   A good debate topic though.

 

Regards,

 

John Wallerich

Chief Solutions Officer 

408-718-2443

 

On Tue, Apr 13, 2021 at 12:12 AM Gaby Mindreci <gaby@...> wrote:

Hello to all,

 

For those who are new to the group, we started a similar discussion one year ago trying to find direction in adopting a realistic metric such as GB of data processed per kWh of power into the data center.

The first attachment was the initial teaser. In the second, I combined various references and since then I accumulated many others. It is clear that the OCP community believes that PUE is not an efficiency indicator but it appears a hard metric with a detailed determination method will not arise unless a specific project is started and some actual effort goes in it.

 

I also did the Data Center Metrics Deficiency presentation at the Tech Week in November. See the last attachment. Slide 6 shows where the significant power losses occur in the power distribution infrastructure. This is a good area to map and define to start with. In addition to this, the elephant in the room is the power used for cooling. This is an area where there is a lot of opportunity for innovation and new technology.

 

Many in this audience and within the OCP community believe in a metric such as GB/kWh and it is a metric that can be assigned to one rack, to a row and a complete data center as well. The challenge is to define the method.

 

Kind regards, Gaby Mindreci

MINDREACH | imagination 2 innovation | www.m-i2i.com

+33 6 33 08 50 62

 

 

From: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of Hesham <helbakoury@...>
Reply-To: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Monday, April 12, 2021 at 7:57 PM
To: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io>, "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

The attached paper describes PUE limitations and suggest other metrics to address them.

Hesham

On 4/12/2021 9:51 AM, Herb Zien wrote:

The PUE formula has flaws and can be gamed.  Power draw is not energy consumption. It is possible to pick a favorable time to read meters, when chillers are not operating for example, in order to make a facility appear more energy efficient than it really is.

 

Also, server fans, which can account for 20% of total rack power at full load, are treated as IT power and not cooling. This increases the denominator, thereby reducing PUE. For example, when data center temperatures are increased the central A/C energy draw might go down but rack fans will need to load up. The PUE goes down when total energy usage might increase.

 

Herb Zien

LiquidCool Solutions, Inc.

(414) 803-6010

 

From: OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Mitchell via groups.io
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2021 11:26 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

PUE is a decent metric above values of 1.20 (or there-abouts).  Key limitation is that improvements in ITE efficiency will cause PUE to increase (worsen) even as data center efficiency improves. 

This impact becomes of greater concern as PUE levels drop below 1.2, and/or use of liquid cooling becomes significant or use of high airflow/delta T in servers becomes significant (see ASHRAE TC9.9 discussions).

 

Each of the other metrics – CUE, WUE, ERE also have flaws that become of greater concern as you maximize sustainability (sort of a Heisenberg uncertainty principle of sustainability metrics)

 

Noble goals, would highlight need for metric maintenance.

 

Kind Regards & Keep Safe

 

Don Mitchell
Data Center Division Manager


Data Center Solutions page


+1-425-379-8335
Don.Mitchell@...

    

100 Years of Innovation - Forbes:  Victaulic’s Industrial Legacy…June 2019

Construction Tech Review – Top 10 BIM Consulting Services Companies:  “From preconstruction through installation, Victaulic provides a suite of services tailored to fit the project needs at every stage of the construction timeline

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of mark.dansie@...
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2021 9:07 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

John,

 

Thanks for your comments.

 

It’s interesting that you’ve mentioned PUE, because it is already one of the metrics listed in the Colo Site Assessment under the title of ‘Efficiency’.  I’ve always believed PUE to be a metric, albeit flawed, to measure data center efficiency rather than sustainability, and therefore I didn’t list it in my email below.

 

PUE is one of the metrics listed in the Colo Site Assessment under the title of ‘Efficiency’ alongside WUE and CUE.  To download a copy of the current OCP Ready colo site assessment go to the link below:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/17F2mGnfxdXLhqXKwc1wVtoQdPFbLRrlJsCsZ1laT3AQ/copy#gid=679407764

 

Being able to measure the Scope 3 emissions for the construction of a facility should be considered.

 

In many respects a colo isn’t any different from other types of data centers, but the request I’ve made for feedback is specifically for the OCP Ready™ Facility Recognition Program, which has been created for colocation solution providers.

 

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Wallerich
Sent: 12 April 2021 15:41
To: ocp-acf@ocp-all.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Mark,

 

It depends on what you're trying to measure.  I would think PUE would be useful but the question is, are you also considering embodied carbons or sustainability from a materials perspective of the facility itself.

 

Energy consumption, like IT load, is a Scope 2 carbon emission where embodied carbons measure Scope 3 emissions.

 

Per your question, when measuring sustainability from a carbon emissions standpoint, is a COLO any different than any other data center?

 

Regards,

 

John

 

On Mon, Apr 12, 2021 at 1:49 AM <mark.dansie@...> wrote:

Hi DCF Group,

 

I would like to get your feedback re: suitable metrics for measuring a colocation data center’s sustainability, that should be used as part of the OCP Ready program .

 

Within the current colo site assessment we have the below attributes that help to measure a data center’s sustainability:

 

  • Site WUE Monitoring
  • Site CUE Monitoring

 

It would be great to have your input on any other metrics that we should be considering, for inclusion in the next iteration of the colo site assessment and also the colo facility guidelines doc., such as Energy Reuse Effectiveness (ERE).

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 


Larry Kosch
 

Hello David,
I scanned the thread for a link or an attached presentation.
Do you mind sharing the presentation?
Thanks
 - LK

On Wed, Apr 14, 2021 at 4:07 PM David Gyulnazaryan via groups.io <david_gyulnazaryan=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi all,
I want to share just two slides from my presentation, where I explain to customers the difference between PUE and real energy consumption for air cooled servers and on chip cooling solution. So, even in 4 case(with loop heat pipe on chips) we have lowest PUE in fact whole data center energy consumption is for 4% lower than conventional IT-load (servers with fans). So, for advanced cooling solution we can specify the servers fans energy consumption as separate part of IT-load.

Встроенное изображение

Встроенное изображение

David Gyulnazaryan
mob. France +33 7 76 23 53 77
mob. UK +44 20 3286 1654
E-mail: david_gyulnazaryan@...
Skype: davidkras
 


среда, 14 апреля 2021 г., 21:06:30 GMT+2, Herb Zien <herb.zien@...> написал(-а):


Jonathon,

You identified a significant problem with the PUE equation, which is defined as Total Facility Power / IT Power.  In the case of immersion cooling pumping power and fans to run the dry cooler appear in the numerator but not the denominator. For air-cooled servers, however, server fans are treated as IT power and the energy to run them, which can represent up to 20% of total server power, is included in the numerator and denominator, which tilts the equation toward air cooling even though more energy is consumed.

 

Herb Zien

LiquidCool Solutions, Inc.

(414) 803-6010

 

From: OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jonathan Evans via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, April 14, 2021 1:33 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hi all,

 

Very interesting discussion. I may not have read all the emails though,  I have a PUE conundrum.

 

We work with Green Revolution Cooling. Immersion cooling solutions.

 

If you have a server load of 1000kW and you remove the fans to immerse them the ‘IT load’  load drops by 10-15%.

 

The only power you need for the immersion cooling is that 10-15% for the pumps. No other cooling load.

 

So what is the PUE?

 

I also work with EcoDataCenter and they are the first facility to show detailed cardon calculations to show they are ‘climate positive’.  Measuring a datacenter carbon footprint including embedded carbon in the servers might be the way forward.

https://ecodatacenter.se/why-ecodatacenter/climate-calculation/

 

Regards

 

Jonathan H. Evans

Director

                    

 

T:  +44(0)7736742797

Ej.evans@...

W: www.totaldatacentresolutions.co.uk

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gaby Mindreci
Sent: 13 April 2021 15:29
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hi John,

 

Everything you say makes sense. This is why I always thought maybe this metric might have merit if taken backwards, from billing. All services are billed right? And if they are billed, then they are measured. And on the same token, power coming in is metered accordingly so therefore theoretically there is a way. We would need to have conventions on north-south, east-west movements, then the relationship of power to stored data, etc.

 

The purpose of knowing how far a watt could go, is to stimulate a race for efficiency. There are plenty of opportunities to improve efficiency (in my presentation, I used an example on connectors which are benign passive components).

Some global locations already really struggle with the amount of power available to their facilities and as this demand goes up, a crisis will soon emerge. Think of power availability to island nations, their infrastructure is heavily dependent on fossil fuel generation and with power demands for computing growing at current rates, it is only a matter of time to recognize in fact that these are the early signs on what is to follow at full global scale.

 

Technology needs to step-up so we are able to meet the needs of the computing industry 10 to 20 years into the future. The efficiency metric is needed to raise awareness, provide easy and instinctive feel on what that efficiency means and to stimulate competition.

 

Kind regards, Gaby Mindreci

MINDREACH | imagination 2 innovation | www.m-i2i.com

+33 6 33 08 50 62

 

 

From: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of John Wallerich <john.wallerich@...>
Reply-To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, April 13, 2021 at 3:33 PM
To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io>, "OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Gaby,

 

Measuring the amount of data processed per kWh is a daunting challenge.  Many years ago while at Intel we tried to develop an easy to use method, but given the complexity of the challenge we never succeeded.  We didn't look at how much data could be processed as that was just one function of a server, and what does "process" mean.

 

John Pflueger of Dell (and Green Grid leader) developed a metric of watts per transaction, a transaction being a much more uniform and measurable metric.  It wasn't perfect, but it was much simpler to use.  Yet today we still struggle to measure the practical benefit of a Watt consumed.  

 

I served in the Green Grid committee that published PUE, and I authored the first paper on DCiE.  We knew the industry would abuse PUE, and they have.  But it has still had a significant impact as it focused on the one area we could affect, the facilities infrastructure.  But at the end of the day, the only metric that really matters is reducing total site power.  I'm not convinced that pursuing the benefit/Watt ratio is feasible or meaningful given the myriad of variables.   A good debate topic though.

 

Regards,

 

John Wallerich

Chief Solutions Officer 

408-718-2443

Image removed by sender.

 

On Tue, Apr 13, 2021 at 12:12 AM Gaby Mindreci <gaby@...> wrote:

Hello to all,

 

For those who are new to the group, we started a similar discussion one year ago trying to find direction in adopting a realistic metric such as GB of data processed per kWh of power into the data center.

The first attachment was the initial teaser. In the second, I combined various references and since then I accumulated many others. It is clear that the OCP community believes that PUE is not an efficiency indicator but it appears a hard metric with a detailed determination method will not arise unless a specific project is started and some actual effort goes in it.

 

I also did the Data Center Metrics Deficiency presentation at the Tech Week in November. See the last attachment. Slide 6 shows where the significant power losses occur in the power distribution infrastructure. This is a good area to map and define to start with. In addition to this, the elephant in the room is the power used for cooling. This is an area where there is a lot of opportunity for innovation and new technology.

 

Many in this audience and within the OCP community believe in a metric such as GB/kWh and it is a metric that can be assigned to one rack, to a row and a complete data center as well. The challenge is to define the method.

 

Kind regards, Gaby Mindreci

MINDREACH | imagination 2 innovation | www.m-i2i.com

+33 6 33 08 50 62

 

 

From: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of Hesham <helbakoury@...>
Reply-To: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Monday, April 12, 2021 at 7:57 PM
To: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io>, "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

The attached paper describes PUE limitations and suggest other metrics to address them.

Hesham

On 4/12/2021 9:51 AM, Herb Zien wrote:

The PUE formula has flaws and can be gamed.  Power draw is not energy consumption. It is possible to pick a favorable time to read meters, when chillers are not operating for example, in order to make a facility appear more energy efficient than it really is.

 

Also, server fans, which can account for 20% of total rack power at full load, are treated as IT power and not cooling. This increases the denominator, thereby reducing PUE. For example, when data center temperatures are increased the central A/C energy draw might go down but rack fans will need to load up. The PUE goes down when total energy usage might increase.

 

Herb Zien

LiquidCool Solutions, Inc.

(414) 803-6010

 

From: OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Mitchell via groups.io
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2021 11:26 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

PUE is a decent metric above values of 1.20 (or there-abouts).  Key limitation is that improvements in ITE efficiency will cause PUE to increase (worsen) even as data center efficiency improves. 

This impact becomes of greater concern as PUE levels drop below 1.2, and/or use of liquid cooling becomes significant or use of high airflow/delta T in servers becomes significant (see ASHRAE TC9.9 discussions).

 

Each of the other metrics – CUE, WUE, ERE also have flaws that become of greater concern as you maximize sustainability (sort of a Heisenberg uncertainty principle of sustainability metrics)

 

Noble goals, would highlight need for metric maintenance.

 

Kind Regards & Keep Safe

 

Don Mitchell
Data Center Division Manager


Data Center Solutions page


+1-425-379-8335
Don.Mitchell@...

    

100 Years of Innovation - Forbes:  Victaulic’s Industrial Legacy…June 2019

Construction Tech Review – Top 10 BIM Consulting Services Companies:  “From preconstruction through installation, Victaulic provides a suite of services tailored to fit the project needs at every stage of the construction timeline

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of mark.dansie@...
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2021 9:07 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

John,

 

Thanks for your comments.

 

It’s interesting that you’ve mentioned PUE, because it is already one of the metrics listed in the Colo Site Assessment under the title of ‘Efficiency’.  I’ve always believed PUE to be a metric, albeit flawed, to measure data center efficiency rather than sustainability, and therefore I didn’t list it in my email below.

 

PUE is one of the metrics listed in the Colo Site Assessment under the title of ‘Efficiency’ alongside WUE and CUE.  To download a copy of the current OCP Ready colo site assessment go to the link below:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/17F2mGnfxdXLhqXKwc1wVtoQdPFbLRrlJsCsZ1laT3AQ/copy#gid=679407764

 

Being able to measure the Scope 3 emissions for the construction of a facility should be considered.

 

In many respects a colo isn’t any different from other types of data centers, but the request I’ve made for feedback is specifically for the OCP Ready™ Facility Recognition Program, which has been created for colocation solution providers.

 

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Wallerich
Sent: 12 April 2021 15:41
To: ocp-acf@ocp-all.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Mark,

 

It depends on what you're trying to measure.  I would think PUE would be useful but the question is, are you also considering embodied carbons or sustainability from a materials perspective of the facility itself.

 

Energy consumption, like IT load, is a Scope 2 carbon emission where embodied carbons measure Scope 3 emissions.

 

Per your question, when measuring sustainability from a carbon emissions standpoint, is a COLO any different than any other data center?

 

Regards,

 

John

 

On Mon, Apr 12, 2021 at 1:49 AM <mark.dansie@...> wrote:

Hi DCF Group,

 

I would like to get your feedback re: suitable metrics for measuring a colocation data center’s sustainability, that should be used as part of the OCP Ready program .

 

Within the current colo site assessment we have the below attributes that help to measure a data center’s sustainability:

 

  • Site WUE Monitoring
  • Site CUE Monitoring

 

It would be great to have your input on any other metrics that we should be considering, for inclusion in the next iteration of the colo site assessment and also the colo facility guidelines doc., such as Energy Reuse Effectiveness (ERE).

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 



--

Larry Kosch

Director, Product Marketing

lkosch@...

512.771.2095

grcooling.com




David Gyulnazaryan
 

Hello Larry and all,
Below the link to view two presentations:


And link to see 20 min. webinar record:



Kind regards,
David Gyulnazaryan
mob. France +33 7 76 23 53 77
mob. UK +44 20 3286 1654
E-mail: david_gyulnazaryan@...
Skype: davidkras
 


четверг, 15 апреля 2021 г., 17:34:48 GMT+2, Larry Kosch <lkosch@...> написал(-а):


Hello David,
I scanned the thread for a link or an attached presentation.
Do you mind sharing the presentation?
Thanks
 - LK

On Wed, Apr 14, 2021 at 4:07 PM David Gyulnazaryan via groups.io <david_gyulnazaryan=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi all,
I want to share just two slides from my presentation, where I explain to customers the difference between PUE and real energy consumption for air cooled servers and on chip cooling solution. So, even in 4 case(with loop heat pipe on chips) we have lowest PUE in fact whole data center energy consumption is for 4% lower than conventional IT-load (servers with fans). So, for advanced cooling solution we can specify the servers fans energy consumption as separate part of IT-load.

Встроенное изображение

Встроенное изображение

David Gyulnazaryan
mob. France +33 7 76 23 53 77
mob. UK +44 20 3286 1654
E-mail: david_gyulnazaryan@...
Skype: davidkras
 


среда, 14 апреля 2021 г., 21:06:30 GMT+2, Herb Zien <herb.zien@...> написал(-а):


Jonathon,

You identified a significant problem with the PUE equation, which is defined as Total Facility Power / IT Power.  In the case of immersion cooling pumping power and fans to run the dry cooler appear in the numerator but not the denominator. For air-cooled servers, however, server fans are treated as IT power and the energy to run them, which can represent up to 20% of total server power, is included in the numerator and denominator, which tilts the equation toward air cooling even though more energy is consumed.

 

Herb Zien

LiquidCool Solutions, Inc.

(414) 803-6010

 

From: OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jonathan Evans via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, April 14, 2021 1:33 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hi all,

 

Very interesting discussion. I may not have read all the emails though,  I have a PUE conundrum.

 

We work with Green Revolution Cooling. Immersion cooling solutions.

 

If you have a server load of 1000kW and you remove the fans to immerse them the ‘IT load’  load drops by 10-15%.

 

The only power you need for the immersion cooling is that 10-15% for the pumps. No other cooling load.

 

So what is the PUE?

 

I also work with EcoDataCenter and they are the first facility to show detailed cardon calculations to show they are ‘climate positive’.  Measuring a datacenter carbon footprint including embedded carbon in the servers might be the way forward.

https://ecodatacenter.se/why-ecodatacenter/climate-calculation/

 

Regards

 

Jonathan H. Evans

Director

                    

 

T:  +44(0)7736742797

Ej.evans@...

W: www.totaldatacentresolutions.co.uk

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gaby Mindreci
Sent: 13 April 2021 15:29
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hi John,

 

Everything you say makes sense. This is why I always thought maybe this metric might have merit if taken backwards, from billing. All services are billed right? And if they are billed, then they are measured. And on the same token, power coming in is metered accordingly so therefore theoretically there is a way. We would need to have conventions on north-south, east-west movements, then the relationship of power to stored data, etc.

 

The purpose of knowing how far a watt could go, is to stimulate a race for efficiency. There are plenty of opportunities to improve efficiency (in my presentation, I used an example on connectors which are benign passive components).

Some global locations already really struggle with the amount of power available to their facilities and as this demand goes up, a crisis will soon emerge. Think of power availability to island nations, their infrastructure is heavily dependent on fossil fuel generation and with power demands for computing growing at current rates, it is only a matter of time to recognize in fact that these are the early signs on what is to follow at full global scale.

 

Technology needs to step-up so we are able to meet the needs of the computing industry 10 to 20 years into the future. The efficiency metric is needed to raise awareness, provide easy and instinctive feel on what that efficiency means and to stimulate competition.

 

Kind regards, Gaby Mindreci

MINDREACH | imagination 2 innovation | www.m-i2i.com

+33 6 33 08 50 62

 

 

From: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of John Wallerich <john.wallerich@...>
Reply-To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, April 13, 2021 at 3:33 PM
To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io>, "OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Gaby,

 

Measuring the amount of data processed per kWh is a daunting challenge.  Many years ago while at Intel we tried to develop an easy to use method, but given the complexity of the challenge we never succeeded.  We didn't look at how much data could be processed as that was just one function of a server, and what does "process" mean.

 

John Pflueger of Dell (and Green Grid leader) developed a metric of watts per transaction, a transaction being a much more uniform and measurable metric.  It wasn't perfect, but it was much simpler to use.  Yet today we still struggle to measure the practical benefit of a Watt consumed.  

 

I served in the Green Grid committee that published PUE, and I authored the first paper on DCiE.  We knew the industry would abuse PUE, and they have.  But it has still had a significant impact as it focused on the one area we could affect, the facilities infrastructure.  But at the end of the day, the only metric that really matters is reducing total site power.  I'm not convinced that pursuing the benefit/Watt ratio is feasible or meaningful given the myriad of variables.   A good debate topic though.

 

Regards,

 

John Wallerich

Chief Solutions Officer 

408-718-2443

Image removed by sender.

 

On Tue, Apr 13, 2021 at 12:12 AM Gaby Mindreci <gaby@...> wrote:

Hello to all,

 

For those who are new to the group, we started a similar discussion one year ago trying to find direction in adopting a realistic metric such as GB of data processed per kWh of power into the data center.

The first attachment was the initial teaser. In the second, I combined various references and since then I accumulated many others. It is clear that the OCP community believes that PUE is not an efficiency indicator but it appears a hard metric with a detailed determination method will not arise unless a specific project is started and some actual effort goes in it.

 

I also did the Data Center Metrics Deficiency presentation at the Tech Week in November. See the last attachment. Slide 6 shows where the significant power losses occur in the power distribution infrastructure. This is a good area to map and define to start with. In addition to this, the elephant in the room is the power used for cooling. This is an area where there is a lot of opportunity for innovation and new technology.

 

Many in this audience and within the OCP community believe in a metric such as GB/kWh and it is a metric that can be assigned to one rack, to a row and a complete data center as well. The challenge is to define the method.

 

Kind regards, Gaby Mindreci

MINDREACH | imagination 2 innovation | www.m-i2i.com

+33 6 33 08 50 62

 

 

From: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of Hesham <helbakoury@...>
Reply-To: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Monday, April 12, 2021 at 7:57 PM
To: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io>, "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

The attached paper describes PUE limitations and suggest other metrics to address them.

Hesham

On 4/12/2021 9:51 AM, Herb Zien wrote:

The PUE formula has flaws and can be gamed.  Power draw is not energy consumption. It is possible to pick a favorable time to read meters, when chillers are not operating for example, in order to make a facility appear more energy efficient than it really is.

 

Also, server fans, which can account for 20% of total rack power at full load, are treated as IT power and not cooling. This increases the denominator, thereby reducing PUE. For example, when data center temperatures are increased the central A/C energy draw might go down but rack fans will need to load up. The PUE goes down when total energy usage might increase.

 

Herb Zien

LiquidCool Solutions, Inc.

(414) 803-6010

 

From: OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Mitchell via groups.io
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2021 11:26 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

PUE is a decent metric above values of 1.20 (or there-abouts).  Key limitation is that improvements in ITE efficiency will cause PUE to increase (worsen) even as data center efficiency improves. 

This impact becomes of greater concern as PUE levels drop below 1.2, and/or use of liquid cooling becomes significant or use of high airflow/delta T in servers becomes significant (see ASHRAE TC9.9 discussions).

 

Each of the other metrics – CUE, WUE, ERE also have flaws that become of greater concern as you maximize sustainability (sort of a Heisenberg uncertainty principle of sustainability metrics)

 

Noble goals, would highlight need for metric maintenance.

 

Kind Regards & Keep Safe

 

Don Mitchell
Data Center Division Manager


Data Center Solutions page


+1-425-379-8335
Don.Mitchell@...

    

100 Years of Innovation - Forbes:  Victaulic’s Industrial Legacy…June 2019

Construction Tech Review – Top 10 BIM Consulting Services Companies:  “From preconstruction through installation, Victaulic provides a suite of services tailored to fit the project needs at every stage of the construction timeline

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of mark.dansie@...
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2021 9:07 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

John,

 

Thanks for your comments.

 

It’s interesting that you’ve mentioned PUE, because it is already one of the metrics listed in the Colo Site Assessment under the title of ‘Efficiency’.  I’ve always believed PUE to be a metric, albeit flawed, to measure data center efficiency rather than sustainability, and therefore I didn’t list it in my email below.

 

PUE is one of the metrics listed in the Colo Site Assessment under the title of ‘Efficiency’ alongside WUE and CUE.  To download a copy of the current OCP Ready colo site assessment go to the link below:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/17F2mGnfxdXLhqXKwc1wVtoQdPFbLRrlJsCsZ1laT3AQ/copy#gid=679407764

 

Being able to measure the Scope 3 emissions for the construction of a facility should be considered.

 

In many respects a colo isn’t any different from other types of data centers, but the request I’ve made for feedback is specifically for the OCP Ready™ Facility Recognition Program, which has been created for colocation solution providers.

 

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Wallerich
Sent: 12 April 2021 15:41
To: ocp-acf@ocp-all.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Mark,

 

It depends on what you're trying to measure.  I would think PUE would be useful but the question is, are you also considering embodied carbons or sustainability from a materials perspective of the facility itself.

 

Energy consumption, like IT load, is a Scope 2 carbon emission where embodied carbons measure Scope 3 emissions.

 

Per your question, when measuring sustainability from a carbon emissions standpoint, is a COLO any different than any other data center?

 

Regards,

 

John

 

On Mon, Apr 12, 2021 at 1:49 AM <mark.dansie@...> wrote:

Hi DCF Group,

 

I would like to get your feedback re: suitable metrics for measuring a colocation data center’s sustainability, that should be used as part of the OCP Ready program .

 

Within the current colo site assessment we have the below attributes that help to measure a data center’s sustainability:

 

  • Site WUE Monitoring
  • Site CUE Monitoring

 

It would be great to have your input on any other metrics that we should be considering, for inclusion in the next iteration of the colo site assessment and also the colo facility guidelines doc., such as Energy Reuse Effectiveness (ERE).

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 



--

Larry Kosch

Director, Product Marketing

lkosch@...

512.771.2095

grcooling.com




mark.dansie@...
 

Hi All,

 

To add to the conversation see below article ‘PUE: The golden metric is looking rusty’  from UTI and Andy Lawrence.

 

https://journal.uptimeinstitute.com/pue-the-golden-metric-is-looking-rusty/

 

The conclusion being ‘The argument here, then, is not for anyone to abandon PUE, or to stop watching and measuring it, but to apply it more cautiously than ever, and more flexibly.’

 

PUE is probably here to stay like it or not, but for the time being maybe we can agree on other metrics for sustainability / decarbonisation, within the OCP community that work alongside PUE, to enhance it and the OCP Ready trademark, that we can then promote to the wider DC industry?

 

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 

 

 

From: OCP-DCF@OCP-All.groups.io <OCP-DCF@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of David Gyulnazaryan via groups.io
Sent: 15 April 2021 18:13
To: ocp-dcf@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-DCF@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: ocp-mdc@ocp-all.groups.io; ocp-acf@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-DCF] [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hello Larry and all,

Below the link to view two presentations:

 

OCP 2021 - Google Drive

 

And link to see 20 min. webinar record:

 

 


Webinar Reduced CAPEX and OPEX in the Data Center. New approaches,the so...

 

 

Kind regards,

David Gyulnazaryan

mob. France +33 7 76 23 53 77
mob. UK +44 20 3286 1654
E-mail: david_gyulnazaryan@...
Skype: davidkras
 

 

 

четверг, 15 апреля 2021 г., 17:34:48 GMT+2, Larry Kosch <lkosch@...> написал(-а):

 

 

Hello David,

I scanned the thread for a link or an attached presentation.

Do you mind sharing the presentation?

Thanks

 - LK

 

On Wed, Apr 14, 2021 at 4:07 PM David Gyulnazaryan via groups.io <david_gyulnazaryan=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Hi all,

I want to share just two slides from my presentation, where I explain to customers the difference between PUE and real energy consumption for air cooled servers and on chip cooling solution. So, even in 4 case(with loop heat pipe on chips) we have lowest PUE in fact whole data center energy consumption is for 4% lower than conventional IT-load (servers with fans). So, for advanced cooling solution we can specify the servers fans energy consumption as separate part of IT-load.

 

Встроенное изображение

 

Встроенное изображение

 

David Gyulnazaryan

mob. France +33 7 76 23 53 77
mob. UK +44 20 3286 1654
E-mail: david_gyulnazaryan@...
Skype: davidkras
 

 

 

среда, 14 апреля 2021 г., 21:06:30 GMT+2, Herb Zien <herb.zien@...> написал(-а):

 

 

Jonathon,

You identified a significant problem with the PUE equation, which is defined as Total Facility Power / IT Power.  In the case of immersion cooling pumping power and fans to run the dry cooler appear in the numerator but not the denominator. For air-cooled servers, however, server fans are treated as IT power and the energy to run them, which can represent up to 20% of total server power, is included in the numerator and denominator, which tilts the equation toward air cooling even though more energy is consumed.

 

Herb Zien

LiquidCool Solutions, Inc.

(414) 803-6010

 

From: OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jonathan Evans via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, April 14, 2021 1:33 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hi all,

 

Very interesting discussion. I may not have read all the emails though,  I have a PUE conundrum.

 

We work with Green Revolution Cooling. Immersion cooling solutions.

 

If you have a server load of 1000kW and you remove the fans to immerse them the ‘IT load’  load drops by 10-15%.

 

The only power you need for the immersion cooling is that 10-15% for the pumps. No other cooling load.

 

So what is the PUE?

 

I also work with EcoDataCenter and they are the first facility to show detailed cardon calculations to show they are ‘climate positive’.  Measuring a datacenter carbon footprint including embedded carbon in the servers might be the way forward.

https://ecodatacenter.se/why-ecodatacenter/climate-calculation/

 

Regards

 

Jonathan H. Evans

Director

                    

 

T:  +44(0)7736742797

Ej.evans@...

W: www.totaldatacentresolutions.co.uk

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gaby Mindreci
Sent: 13 April 2021 15:29
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hi John,

 

Everything you say makes sense. This is why I always thought maybe this metric might have merit if taken backwards, from billing. All services are billed right? And if they are billed, then they are measured. And on the same token, power coming in is metered accordingly so therefore theoretically there is a way. We would need to have conventions on north-south, east-west movements, then the relationship of power to stored data, etc.

 

The purpose of knowing how far a watt could go, is to stimulate a race for efficiency. There are plenty of opportunities to improve efficiency (in my presentation, I used an example on connectors which are benign passive components).

Some global locations already really struggle with the amount of power available to their facilities and as this demand goes up, a crisis will soon emerge. Think of power availability to island nations, their infrastructure is heavily dependent on fossil fuel generation and with power demands for computing growing at current rates, it is only a matter of time to recognize in fact that these are the early signs on what is to follow at full global scale.

 

Technology needs to step-up so we are able to meet the needs of the computing industry 10 to 20 years into the future. The efficiency metric is needed to raise awareness, provide easy and instinctive feel on what that efficiency means and to stimulate competition.

 

Kind regards, Gaby Mindreci

MINDREACH | imagination 2 innovation | www.m-i2i.com

+33 6 33 08 50 62

 

 

From: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of John Wallerich <john.wallerich@...>
Reply-To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, April 13, 2021 at 3:33 PM
To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io>, "OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Gaby,

 

Measuring the amount of data processed per kWh is a daunting challenge.  Many years ago while at Intel we tried to develop an easy to use method, but given the complexity of the challenge we never succeeded.  We didn't look at how much data could be processed as that was just one function of a server, and what does "process" mean.

 

John Pflueger of Dell (and Green Grid leader) developed a metric of watts per transaction, a transaction being a much more uniform and measurable metric.  It wasn't perfect, but it was much simpler to use.  Yet today we still struggle to measure the practical benefit of a Watt consumed.  

 

I served in the Green Grid committee that published PUE, and I authored the first paper on DCiE.  We knew the industry would abuse PUE, and they have.  But it has still had a significant impact as it focused on the one area we could affect, the facilities infrastructure.  But at the end of the day, the only metric that really matters is reducing total site power.  I'm not convinced that pursuing the benefit/Watt ratio is feasible or meaningful given the myriad of variables.   A good debate topic though.

 

Regards,

 

John Wallerich

Chief Solutions Officer 

408-718-2443

 

On Tue, Apr 13, 2021 at 12:12 AM Gaby Mindreci <gaby@...> wrote:

Hello to all,

 

For those who are new to the group, we started a similar discussion one year ago trying to find direction in adopting a realistic metric such as GB of data processed per kWh of power into the data center.

The first attachment was the initial teaser. In the second, I combined various references and since then I accumulated many others. It is clear that the OCP community believes that PUE is not an efficiency indicator but it appears a hard metric with a detailed determination method will not arise unless a specific project is started and some actual effort goes in it.

 

I also did the Data Center Metrics Deficiency presentation at the Tech Week in November. See the last attachment. Slide 6 shows where the significant power losses occur in the power distribution infrastructure. This is a good area to map and define to start with. In addition to this, the elephant in the room is the power used for cooling. This is an area where there is a lot of opportunity for innovation and new technology.

 

Many in this audience and within the OCP community believe in a metric such as GB/kWh and it is a metric that can be assigned to one rack, to a row and a complete data center as well. The challenge is to define the method.

 

Kind regards, Gaby Mindreci

MINDREACH | imagination 2 innovation | www.m-i2i.com

+33 6 33 08 50 62

 

 

From: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of Hesham <helbakoury@...>
Reply-To: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Monday, April 12, 2021 at 7:57 PM
To: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io>, "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

The attached paper describes PUE limitations and suggest other metrics to address them.

Hesham

On 4/12/2021 9:51 AM, Herb Zien wrote:

The PUE formula has flaws and can be gamed.  Power draw is not energy consumption. It is possible to pick a favorable time to read meters, when chillers are not operating for example, in order to make a facility appear more energy efficient than it really is.

 

Also, server fans, which can account for 20% of total rack power at full load, are treated as IT power and not cooling. This increases the denominator, thereby reducing PUE. For example, when data center temperatures are increased the central A/C energy draw might go down but rack fans will need to load up. The PUE goes down when total energy usage might increase.

 

Herb Zien

LiquidCool Solutions, Inc.

(414) 803-6010

 

From: OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Mitchell via groups.io
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2021 11:26 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

PUE is a decent metric above values of 1.20 (or there-abouts).  Key limitation is that improvements in ITE efficiency will cause PUE to increase (worsen) even as data center efficiency improves. 

This impact becomes of greater concern as PUE levels drop below 1.2, and/or use of liquid cooling becomes significant or use of high airflow/delta T in servers becomes significant (see ASHRAE TC9.9 discussions).

 

Each of the other metrics – CUE, WUE, ERE also have flaws that become of greater concern as you maximize sustainability (sort of a Heisenberg uncertainty principle of sustainability metrics)

 

Noble goals, would highlight need for metric maintenance.

 

Kind Regards & Keep Safe

 

Don Mitchell
Data Center Division Manager


Data Center Solutions page


+1-425-379-8335
Don.Mitchell@...

    

100 Years of Innovation - Forbes:  Victaulic’s Industrial Legacy…June 2019

Construction Tech Review – Top 10 BIM Consulting Services Companies:  “From preconstruction through installation, Victaulic provides a suite of services tailored to fit the project needs at every stage of the construction timeline

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of mark.dansie@...
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2021 9:07 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

John,

 

Thanks for your comments.

 

It’s interesting that you’ve mentioned PUE, because it is already one of the metrics listed in the Colo Site Assessment under the title of ‘Efficiency’.  I’ve always believed PUE to be a metric, albeit flawed, to measure data center efficiency rather than sustainability, and therefore I didn’t list it in my email below.

 

PUE is one of the metrics listed in the Colo Site Assessment under the title of ‘Efficiency’ alongside WUE and CUE.  To download a copy of the current OCP Ready colo site assessment go to the link below:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/17F2mGnfxdXLhqXKwc1wVtoQdPFbLRrlJsCsZ1laT3AQ/copy#gid=679407764

 

Being able to measure the Scope 3 emissions for the construction of a facility should be considered.

 

In many respects a colo isn’t any different from other types of data centers, but the request I’ve made for feedback is specifically for the OCP Ready™ Facility Recognition Program, which has been created for colocation solution providers.

 

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Wallerich
Sent: 12 April 2021 15:41
To: ocp-acf@ocp-all.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Mark,

 

It depends on what you're trying to measure.  I would think PUE would be useful but the question is, are you also considering embodied carbons or sustainability from a materials perspective of the facility itself.

 

Energy consumption, like IT load, is a Scope 2 carbon emission where embodied carbons measure Scope 3 emissions.

 

Per your question, when measuring sustainability from a carbon emissions standpoint, is a COLO any different than any other data center?

 

Regards,

 

John

 

On Mon, Apr 12, 2021 at 1:49 AM <mark.dansie@...> wrote:

Hi DCF Group,

 

I would like to get your feedback re: suitable metrics for measuring a colocation data center’s sustainability, that should be used as part of the OCP Ready program .

 

Within the current colo site assessment we have the below attributes that help to measure a data center’s sustainability:

 

  • Site WUE Monitoring
  • Site CUE Monitoring

 

It would be great to have your input on any other metrics that we should be considering, for inclusion in the next iteration of the colo site assessment and also the colo facility guidelines doc., such as Energy Reuse Effectiveness (ERE).

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 


 

--

Larry Kosch

Director, Product Marketing

lkosch@...

512.771.2095

grcooling.com

 


Gaby Mindreci
 

Hi Mark,

 

It will be very difficult to find consensus. We are no farther than where we were one year ago. Many agree with the fact that PUE improvement does not equate increased efficiencies in power distribution equipment or in cooling and probably there is no motivation to open that door. In a better world, a regulatory body or possibly OCP, would advocate updated performance objectives for power distribution and cooling. As an example, if cooling would be limited at 15% of total power use and every 2 years another 1% would come off of the allowance, then this would be the kind of guideline that will drive a genuine and imminent effort for the development of better solutions. This would be in line with decarbonization objectives and in the end we get to protect our planet. Maybe we do need such a different angle for the approach, I am not sure what the best path forward is but it is a topic of importance and the majority in the community would need to be in agreement.

 

Gaby Mindreci

 

Kind regards,

MINDREACH i2i SL | imagination 2 innovation | m-i2i.com

tel +33 6 33 08 50 62

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Confidentiality Notice:    This e-mail, including any attachments, may contain privileged and/or confidential information and is intended for the addressee’s use only. If you receive this e-mail in error or are not the intended recipient, you may not use, reproduce, disseminate or distribute it. Do not open nor save any attachments, please delete it immediately from your system, destroy any copies and/or printouts and notify the sender promptly by e-mail confirming that you have done so. Thank you.

 

 

From: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of Mark Dansie <mark.dansie@...>
Reply-To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Monday, April 19, 2021 at 7:23 PM
To: "OCP-DCF@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "ocp-mdc@ocp-all.groups.io" <ocp-mdc@ocp-all.groups.io>, "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-DCF] [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hi All,

 

To add to the conversation see below article ‘PUE: The golden metric is looking rusty’  from UTI and Andy Lawrence.

 

https://journal.uptimeinstitute.com/pue-the-golden-metric-is-looking-rusty/

 

The conclusion being ‘The argument here, then, is not for anyone to abandon PUE, or to stop watching and measuring it, but to apply it more cautiously than ever, and more flexibly.’

 

PUE is probably here to stay like it or not, but for the time being maybe we can agree on other metrics for sustainability / decarbonisation, within the OCP community that work alongside PUE, to enhance it and the OCP Ready trademark, that we can then promote to the wider DC industry?

 

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 

 

 

From: OCP-DCF@OCP-All.groups.io <OCP-DCF@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of David Gyulnazaryan via groups.io
Sent: 15 April 2021 18:13
To: ocp-dcf@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-DCF@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: ocp-mdc@ocp-all.groups.io; ocp-acf@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-DCF] [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hello Larry and all,

Below the link to view two presentations:

 

OCP 2021 - Google Drive

 

And link to see 20 min. webinar record:

 

 


Webinar Reduced CAPEX and OPEX in the Data Center. New approaches,the so...

 

 

Kind regards,

David Gyulnazaryan

mob. France +33 7 76 23 53 77
mob. UK +44 20 3286 1654
E-mail: david_gyulnazaryan@...
Skype: davidkras
 

 

 

четверг, 15 апреля 2021 г., 17:34:48 GMT+2, Larry Kosch <lkosch@...> написал(-а):

 

 

Hello David,

I scanned the thread for a link or an attached presentation.

Do you mind sharing the presentation?

Thanks

 - LK

 

On Wed, Apr 14, 2021 at 4:07 PM David Gyulnazaryan via groups.io <david_gyulnazaryan=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Hi all,

I want to share just two slides from my presentation, where I explain to customers the difference between PUE and real energy consumption for air cooled servers and on chip cooling solution. So, even in 4 case(with loop heat pipe on chips) we have lowest PUE in fact whole data center energy consumption is for 4% lower than conventional IT-load (servers with fans). So, for advanced cooling solution we can specify the servers fans energy consumption as separate part of IT-load.

 

Встроенное изображение

 

Встроенное изображение

 

David Gyulnazaryan

mob. France +33 7 76 23 53 77
mob. UK +44 20 3286 1654
E-mail: david_gyulnazaryan@...
Skype: davidkras
 

 

 

среда, 14 апреля 2021 г., 21:06:30 GMT+2, Herb Zien <herb.zien@...> написал(-а):

 

 

Jonathon,

You identified a significant problem with the PUE equation, which is defined as Total Facility Power / IT Power.  In the case of immersion cooling pumping power and fans to run the dry cooler appear in the numerator but not the denominator. For air-cooled servers, however, server fans are treated as IT power and the energy to run them, which can represent up to 20% of total server power, is included in the numerator and denominator, which tilts the equation toward air cooling even though more energy is consumed.

 

Herb Zien

LiquidCool Solutions, Inc.

(414) 803-6010

 

From: OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jonathan Evans via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, April 14, 2021 1:33 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hi all,

 

Very interesting discussion. I may not have read all the emails though,  I have a PUE conundrum.

 

We work with Green Revolution Cooling. Immersion cooling solutions.

 

If you have a server load of 1000kW and you remove the fans to immerse them the ‘IT load’  load drops by 10-15%.

 

The only power you need for the immersion cooling is that 10-15% for the pumps. No other cooling load.

 

So what is the PUE?

 

I also work with EcoDataCenter and they are the first facility to show detailed cardon calculations to show they are ‘climate positive’.  Measuring a datacenter carbon footprint including embedded carbon in the servers might be the way forward.

https://ecodatacenter.se/why-ecodatacenter/climate-calculation/

 

Regards

 

Jonathan H. Evans

Director

                    

 

T:  +44(0)7736742797

Ej.evans@...

W: www.totaldatacentresolutions.co.uk

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gaby Mindreci
Sent: 13 April 2021 15:29
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hi John,

 

Everything you say makes sense. This is why I always thought maybe this metric might have merit if taken backwards, from billing. All services are billed right? And if they are billed, then they are measured. And on the same token, power coming in is metered accordingly so therefore theoretically there is a way. We would need to have conventions on north-south, east-west movements, then the relationship of power to stored data, etc.

 

The purpose of knowing how far a watt could go, is to stimulate a race for efficiency. There are plenty of opportunities to improve efficiency (in my presentation, I used an example on connectors which are benign passive components).

Some global locations already really struggle with the amount of power available to their facilities and as this demand goes up, a crisis will soon emerge. Think of power availability to island nations, their infrastructure is heavily dependent on fossil fuel generation and with power demands for computing growing at current rates, it is only a matter of time to recognize in fact that these are the early signs on what is to follow at full global scale.

 

Technology needs to step-up so we are able to meet the needs of the computing industry 10 to 20 years into the future. The efficiency metric is needed to raise awareness, provide easy and instinctive feel on what that efficiency means and to stimulate competition.

 

Kind regards, Gaby Mindreci

MINDREACH | imagination 2 innovation | www.m-i2i.com

+33 6 33 08 50 62

 

 

From: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of John Wallerich <john.wallerich@...>
Reply-To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, April 13, 2021 at 3:33 PM
To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io>, "OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Gaby,

 

Measuring the amount of data processed per kWh is a daunting challenge.  Many years ago while at Intel we tried to develop an easy to use method, but given the complexity of the challenge we never succeeded.  We didn't look at how much data could be processed as that was just one function of a server, and what does "process" mean.

 

John Pflueger of Dell (and Green Grid leader) developed a metric of watts per transaction, a transaction being a much more uniform and measurable metric.  It wasn't perfect, but it was much simpler to use.  Yet today we still struggle to measure the practical benefit of a Watt consumed.  

 

I served in the Green Grid committee that published PUE, and I authored the first paper on DCiE.  We knew the industry would abuse PUE, and they have.  But it has still had a significant impact as it focused on the one area we could affect, the facilities infrastructure.  But at the end of the day, the only metric that really matters is reducing total site power.  I'm not convinced that pursuing the benefit/Watt ratio is feasible or meaningful given the myriad of variables.   A good debate topic though.

 

Regards,

 

John Wallerich

Chief Solutions Officer 

408-718-2443

 

On Tue, Apr 13, 2021 at 12:12 AM Gaby Mindreci <gaby@...> wrote:

Hello to all,

 

For those who are new to the group, we started a similar discussion one year ago trying to find direction in adopting a realistic metric such as GB of data processed per kWh of power into the data center.

The first attachment was the initial teaser. In the second, I combined various references and since then I accumulated many others. It is clear that the OCP community believes that PUE is not an efficiency indicator but it appears a hard metric with a detailed determination method will not arise unless a specific project is started and some actual effort goes in it.

 

I also did the Data Center Metrics Deficiency presentation at the Tech Week in November. See the last attachment. Slide 6 shows where the significant power losses occur in the power distribution infrastructure. This is a good area to map and define to start with. In addition to this, the elephant in the room is the power used for cooling. This is an area where there is a lot of opportunity for innovation and new technology.

 

Many in this audience and within the OCP community believe in a metric such as GB/kWh and it is a metric that can be assigned to one rack, to a row and a complete data center as well. The challenge is to define the method.

 

Kind regards, Gaby Mindreci

MINDREACH | imagination 2 innovation | www.m-i2i.com

+33 6 33 08 50 62

 

 

From: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of Hesham <helbakoury@...>
Reply-To: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Monday, April 12, 2021 at 7:57 PM
To: "OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io>, "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

The attached paper describes PUE limitations and suggest other metrics to address them.

Hesham

On 4/12/2021 9:51 AM, Herb Zien wrote:

The PUE formula has flaws and can be gamed.  Power draw is not energy consumption. It is possible to pick a favorable time to read meters, when chillers are not operating for example, in order to make a facility appear more energy efficient than it really is.

 

Also, server fans, which can account for 20% of total rack power at full load, are treated as IT power and not cooling. This increases the denominator, thereby reducing PUE. For example, when data center temperatures are increased the central A/C energy draw might go down but rack fans will need to load up. The PUE goes down when total energy usage might increase.

 

Herb Zien

LiquidCool Solutions, Inc.

(414) 803-6010

 

From: OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Mitchell via groups.io
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2021 11:26 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

PUE is a decent metric above values of 1.20 (or there-abouts).  Key limitation is that improvements in ITE efficiency will cause PUE to increase (worsen) even as data center efficiency improves. 

This impact becomes of greater concern as PUE levels drop below 1.2, and/or use of liquid cooling becomes significant or use of high airflow/delta T in servers becomes significant (see ASHRAE TC9.9 discussions).

 

Each of the other metrics – CUE, WUE, ERE also have flaws that become of greater concern as you maximize sustainability (sort of a Heisenberg uncertainty principle of sustainability metrics)

 

Noble goals, would highlight need for metric maintenance.

 

Kind Regards & Keep Safe

 

Don Mitchell
Data Center Division Manager


Data Center Solutions page


+1-425-379-8335
Don.Mitchell@...

    

100 Years of Innovation - Forbes:  Victaulic’s Industrial Legacy…June 2019

Construction Tech Review – Top 10 BIM Consulting Services Companies:  “From preconstruction through installation, Victaulic provides a suite of services tailored to fit the project needs at every stage of the construction timeline

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of mark.dansie@...
Sent: Monday, April 12, 2021 9:07 AM
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

John,

 

Thanks for your comments.

 

It’s interesting that you’ve mentioned PUE, because it is already one of the metrics listed in the Colo Site Assessment under the title of ‘Efficiency’.  I’ve always believed PUE to be a metric, albeit flawed, to measure data center efficiency rather than sustainability, and therefore I didn’t list it in my email below.

 

PUE is one of the metrics listed in the Colo Site Assessment under the title of ‘Efficiency’ alongside WUE and CUE.  To download a copy of the current OCP Ready colo site assessment go to the link below:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/17F2mGnfxdXLhqXKwc1wVtoQdPFbLRrlJsCsZ1laT3AQ/copy#gid=679407764

 

Being able to measure the Scope 3 emissions for the construction of a facility should be considered.

 

In many respects a colo isn’t any different from other types of data centers, but the request I’ve made for feedback is specifically for the OCP Ready™ Facility Recognition Program, which has been created for colocation solution providers.

 

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 

 

 

From: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Wallerich
Sent: 12 April 2021 15:41
To: ocp-acf@ocp-all.groups.io
Cc: OCP-DCF@ocp-all.groups.io; OCP-MDC@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Mark,

 

It depends on what you're trying to measure.  I would think PUE would be useful but the question is, are you also considering embodied carbons or sustainability from a materials perspective of the facility itself.

 

Energy consumption, like IT load, is a Scope 2 carbon emission where embodied carbons measure Scope 3 emissions.

 

Per your question, when measuring sustainability from a carbon emissions standpoint, is a COLO any different than any other data center?

 

Regards,

 

John

 

On Mon, Apr 12, 2021 at 1:49 AM <mark.dansie@...> wrote:

Hi DCF Group,

 

I would like to get your feedback re: suitable metrics for measuring a colocation data center’s sustainability, that should be used as part of the OCP Ready program .

 

Within the current colo site assessment we have the below attributes that help to measure a data center’s sustainability:

 

  • Site WUE Monitoring
  • Site CUE Monitoring

 

It would be great to have your input on any other metrics that we should be considering, for inclusion in the next iteration of the colo site assessment and also the colo facility guidelines doc., such as Energy Reuse Effectiveness (ERE).

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 


 

--

Larry Kosch

Director, Product Marketing

lkosch@...

512.771.2095

grcooling.com

 


Don Mitchell
 

PUE currently has 3 levels of measurement. 

If a 4th level were created that more accurately measured power into the chip, most of the concerns around PUE would be addressed.

Key barriers

  • measuring (or approximating) power consumed by ITE fans and power supplies (this barrier is common to all metrics of ITE efficiency, not just PUE)
  • Motivating update to PUE

 

Kind Regards & Keep Safe

 

Don Mitchell
Data Center Division Manager


Data Center Solutions page


+1-425-379-8335
Don.Mitchell@...

    

100 Years of Innovation - Forbes:  Victaulic’s Industrial Legacy…June 2019

Construction Tech Review – Top 10 BIM Consulting Services Companies:  “From preconstruction through installation, Victaulic provides a suite of services tailored to fit the project needs at every stage of the construction timeline

 

 

From: OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of chris@...
Sent: Tuesday, April 20, 2021 6:03 AM
To: OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io; ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io; OCP-DCF@OCP-All.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-DCF] [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

I believe the most are in agreement that reducing power demands of Data Centres is a good thing, and there have been some great posts reflecting this.

It’s clear to see that there is massive debate around PUE and the other metrics, and agreement on exactly what they mean is probably difficult to achieve.

Thinking about the work versus effort, as others have mentioned, it has been common to use Miles Per Gallon as a factor when considering what car to purchase.  I think that the “work” that a Data Centre does is process data but there appears to be no real way of measuring how much data is actually processed in a given time; if there were, then it would be possible to state something like “this facility can process x amount of data for y amount of power”.  I realise though that even this measurement would be subject to a lot of debate.

In lieu of a measurement like “bits per kW”, the measurement of IT power versus overall site power has been often used to “rate” a facility.

So, if we are unable to measure the amount of data processed, and we need to use IT power versus overall facility power as a rating, then would it be possible to measure the “IT power” as that which actually enters the IT circuit boards?  Everything else but that power being included in the “overall facility” power.

Going back to the car analogy, if you couldn’t measure how many miles the car travels for a gallon of fuel, and you used the Data Centre method, you’d have to calculate the energy output at the drive shaft and compare that to all of the energy needed to run the car, including engine cooling, air conditioning, lighting and electronics.

Perhaps one of the best ways to progress is for everyone to work together to reduce power usage in Data Centres, as Mark perfectly put itPUE is probably here to stay like it or not, but for the time being maybe we can agree on other metrics for sustainability / decarbonisation, within the OCP community that work alongside PUE, to enhance it and the OCP Ready trademark, that we can then promote to the wider DC industry?”.  There are some incredibly talented people in this thread alone, so I’m sure that is possible.

 

 

From: OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gaby Mindreci
Sent: 19 April 2021 21:17
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io; OCP-DCF@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: ocp-mdc@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-DCF] [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hi Mark,

 

It will be very difficult to find consensus. We are no farther than where we were one year ago. Many agree with the fact that PUE improvement does not equate increased efficiencies in power distribution equipment or in cooling and probably there is no motivation to open that door. In a better world, a regulatory body or possibly OCP, would advocate updated performance objectives for power distribution and cooling. As an example, if cooling would be limited at 15% of total power use and every 2 years another 1% would come off of the allowance, then this would be the kind of guideline that will drive a genuine and imminent effort for the development of better solutions. This would be in line with decarbonization objectives and in the end we get to protect our planet. Maybe we do need such a different angle for the approach, I am not sure what the best path forward is but it is a topic of importance and the majority in the community would need to be in agreement.

 

Gaby Mindreci

 

Kind regards,

MINDREACH i2i SL | imagination 2 innovation | m-i2i.com

tel +33 6 33 08 50 62

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Description automatically generated

 

 

 

Confidentiality Notice:    This e-mail, including any attachments, may contain privileged and/or confidential information and is intended for the addressee’s use only. If you receive this e-mail in error or are not the intended recipient, you may not use, reproduce, disseminate or distribute it. Do not open nor save any attachments, please delete it immediately from your system, destroy any copies and/or printouts and notify the sender promptly by e-mail confirming that you have done so. Thank you.

 

 

From: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of Mark Dansie <mark.dansie@...>
Reply-To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Monday, April 19, 2021 at 7:23 PM
To: "OCP-DCF@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "ocp-mdc@ocp-all.groups.io" <ocp-mdc@ocp-all.groups.io>, "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-DCF] [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hi All,

 

To add to the conversation see below article ‘PUE: The golden metric is looking rusty’  from UTI and Andy Lawrence.

 

https://journal.uptimeinstitute.com/pue-the-golden-metric-is-looking-rusty/

 

The conclusion being ‘The argument here, then, is not for anyone to abandon PUE, or to stop watching and measuring it, but to apply it more cautiously than ever, and more flexibly.’

 

PUE is probably here to stay like it or not, but for the time being maybe we can agree on other metrics for sustainability / decarbonisation, within the OCP community that work alongside PUE, to enhance it and the OCP Ready trademark, that we can then promote to the wider DC industry?

 

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 

 

 


mark.dansie@...
 

Hi All,

 

Thanks for your suggestions and comments, it would be great if you could all take this discussion further as part of the OCP Sustainability Initiative, and in particular within the Metrics Workstream.  The next call is today at 11am CT , 6pm GMT, 7pm CET.  See details below and also please subscribe to the mailing list: https://ocp-all.groups.io/g/Sustainability-Metrics-LCA

 

 

OCP Sustainability Initiative - Metrics Workstream Call

When

Weekly from 11am to 12pm on Wednesday Central Time - Chicago

Calendar

: sustainability-metrics-lca@ocp-all.groups.io

 

 

more details »

Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://www.gotomeet.me/Michael-Schill/ocp-sustainability-initiative-call-line

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Join from a video-conferencing room or system.
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Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896

 

 

From: OCP-DCF@OCP-All.groups.io <OCP-DCF@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Mitchell
Sent: 20 April 2021 14:34
To: OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io; ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io; OCP-DCF@OCP-All.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-DCF] [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

PUE currently has 3 levels of measurement. 

If a 4th level were created that more accurately measured power into the chip, most of the concerns around PUE would be addressed.

Key barriers

  • measuring (or approximating) power consumed by ITE fans and power supplies (this barrier is common to all metrics of ITE efficiency, not just PUE)
  • Motivating update to PUE

 

Kind Regards & Keep Safe

 

Don Mitchell
Data Center Division Manager


Data Center Solutions page


+1-425-379-8335
Don.Mitchell@...

    

100 Years of Innovation - Forbes:  Victaulic’s Industrial Legacy…June 2019

Construction Tech Review – Top 10 BIM Consulting Services Companies:  “From preconstruction through installation, Victaulic provides a suite of services tailored to fit the project needs at every stage of the construction timeline

 

 

From: OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of chris@...
Sent: Tuesday, April 20, 2021 6:03 AM
To: OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io; ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io; OCP-DCF@OCP-All.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-DCF] [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

I believe the most are in agreement that reducing power demands of Data Centres is a good thing, and there have been some great posts reflecting this.

It’s clear to see that there is massive debate around PUE and the other metrics, and agreement on exactly what they mean is probably difficult to achieve.

Thinking about the work versus effort, as others have mentioned, it has been common to use Miles Per Gallon as a factor when considering what car to purchase.  I think that the “work” that a Data Centre does is process data but there appears to be no real way of measuring how much data is actually processed in a given time; if there were, then it would be possible to state something like “this facility can process x amount of data for y amount of power”.  I realise though that even this measurement would be subject to a lot of debate.

In lieu of a measurement like “bits per kW”, the measurement of IT power versus overall site power has been often used to “rate” a facility.

So, if we are unable to measure the amount of data processed, and we need to use IT power versus overall facility power as a rating, then would it be possible to measure the “IT power” as that which actually enters the IT circuit boards?  Everything else but that power being included in the “overall facility” power.

Going back to the car analogy, if you couldn’t measure how many miles the car travels for a gallon of fuel, and you used the Data Centre method, you’d have to calculate the energy output at the drive shaft and compare that to all of the energy needed to run the car, including engine cooling, air conditioning, lighting and electronics.

Perhaps one of the best ways to progress is for everyone to work together to reduce power usage in Data Centres, as Mark perfectly put itPUE is probably here to stay like it or not, but for the time being maybe we can agree on other metrics for sustainability / decarbonisation, within the OCP community that work alongside PUE, to enhance it and the OCP Ready trademark, that we can then promote to the wider DC industry?”.  There are some incredibly talented people in this thread alone, so I’m sure that is possible.

 

 

From: OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io <OCP-MDC@OCP-All.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gaby Mindreci
Sent: 19 April 2021 21:17
To: ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io; OCP-DCF@OCP-All.groups.io
Cc: ocp-mdc@ocp-all.groups.io
Subject: Re: [OCP-DCF] [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hi Mark,

 

It will be very difficult to find consensus. We are no farther than where we were one year ago. Many agree with the fact that PUE improvement does not equate increased efficiencies in power distribution equipment or in cooling and probably there is no motivation to open that door. In a better world, a regulatory body or possibly OCP, would advocate updated performance objectives for power distribution and cooling. As an example, if cooling would be limited at 15% of total power use and every 2 years another 1% would come off of the allowance, then this would be the kind of guideline that will drive a genuine and imminent effort for the development of better solutions. This would be in line with decarbonization objectives and in the end we get to protect our planet. Maybe we do need such a different angle for the approach, I am not sure what the best path forward is but it is a topic of importance and the majority in the community would need to be in agreement.

 

Gaby Mindreci

 

Kind regards,

MINDREACH i2i SL | imagination 2 innovation | m-i2i.com

tel +33 6 33 08 50 62

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From: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io> on behalf of Mark Dansie <mark.dansie@...>
Reply-To: "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Date: Monday, April 19, 2021 at 7:23 PM
To: "OCP-DCF@OCP-All.groups.io" <OCP-DCF@OCP-All.groups.io>
Cc: "ocp-mdc@ocp-all.groups.io" <ocp-mdc@ocp-all.groups.io>, "ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io" <ocp-acf@OCP-All.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [OCP-DCF] [OCP-MDC] [ocp-acf] OCP Ready - Colo Site Assessment - Sustainability Metrics

 

Hi All,

 

To add to the conversation see below article ‘PUE: The golden metric is looking rusty’  from UTI and Andy Lawrence.

 

https://journal.uptimeinstitute.com/pue-the-golden-metric-is-looking-rusty/

 

The conclusion being ‘The argument here, then, is not for anyone to abandon PUE, or to stop watching and measuring it, but to apply it more cautiously than ever, and more flexibly.’

 

PUE is probably here to stay like it or not, but for the time being maybe we can agree on other metrics for sustainability / decarbonisation, within the OCP community that work alongside PUE, to enhance it and the OCP Ready trademark, that we can then promote to the wider DC industry?

 

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Mark Dansie

OCP ReadyTM Lead

Open Compute Project (OCP)  

Mobile/Signal/WhatsApp/Telegram: +447986 502 896